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What is Impact Factor?
 
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WHAT IS IMPACT FACTOR? How is it calculated? How useful is the current system for authors? This short video gives a quick overview of these terms as they relate to scholarly publishing. MORE VIDEOS on Impact Factor: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3haOX2S0PcSz43EKAKXfQN9 FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there. This is John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to give an overview of Impact Factor. Impact Factor is used by many as a stand in for the relative importance of a journal in its scholarly field. A high Impact Factor is considered good; a lower Impact Factor not as much. The Impact Factor is calculated from the Journal Citation Report or JCR published by Thomson Reuters, a for-profit company. It was founded in 1975 and is derived from the Science Citation Index and the Social Science Citation Index. It covers about 11,000 journals, from 2,500 publishers, from about 80 different countries. So how is Impact Factor calculated? The Impact Factor for a journal is calculated by the total number of citations for all the articles published in the preceding two years divided by the total number of articles published in that journal during those two years. For example: if a journal has an Impact Factor of 2 in 2015, that means all the articles published in 2013 and 2014 have, on average, 2 citations each during that time period. Impact Factors represent the previous year. That is the 2016 represent the statistics for the year 2015. Impact Factors are used to compare journals within a specific field, and are not meant to compare journals from one field to the other. There is such a thing as also a 5-year Impact Factor, but this is used by fewer authors and librarians and is not as common. So how useful is the current Impact Factor system? For many, it is coin of the realm as to where to submit an article for an author or which publication to subscribe to for a librarian. It does provide a metric for this citation-based statistic. But for many, they view Impact Factor as having faults. Top of the list: Impact Factor can’t truly measure a journal’s importance, as it is perceived by many to do. Journals are complex and it is difficult to quantify exactly where they stand compared to other journals. Of additional concern, is a single groundbreaking article can inflate a journal’s Impact factor for a couple of years and not really spill over and have an effect on the journal or other articles. Gaming the system is a concern as well. Editors, editorial boards, or even authors can knowingly self-cite the publication thereby affecting Impact Factor. Thomson Reuters does not endorse this practice and they work to prevent it. Publishing, or business decisions, to only publish review articles or “by invitation only” or by eliminating certain of content types may affect Impact Factor as well. Impact Factor will continue to be important, while being criticized by others. But it will have to grow and evolve within the system. Author level metrics, institutional level metrics, article level metrics will ensure that this evolution happens. More on that including altmetrics later. Well that’s it. Thank you very much. Please click here to subscribe to my YouTube channel and also click on here to see more videos about Impact Factor. Or leave a comment below or send me an email. Thank you very much and take care.
Views: 12570 John Bond
How Do I Choose the Best Journal for My Paper?
 
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HOW DO I CHOOSE THE BEST JOURNAL FOR MY PAPER? Which journal is the best one in scholarly publishing for my paper? This video lists the decision points when making this decision. MORE VIDEOS on Choosing Which Journal to Publish Your Article https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3jkGjy26P2tVNragL2ik0c2 FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: How do I decide the best journal for my paper? Hi there, I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to be discussing how to choose a scholarly journal for you to submit your paper to. A bit about me: I’ve been in scholarly publishing for over 25 year and as Chief Content Officer for a major medical publisher oversaw the publishing of over 20,000 peer reviewed articles. So, you have collected your data and information or completed your study. You have written your paper. Now what? Prior to deciding, make sure you have had the paper read and critiqued by your colleagues and associates. Consider very carefully their feedback and make the changes where you see fit. Remember to give it one more very close check for grammar, spelling, format and style before moving on. Now you are ready. In starting to consider where to submit your paper, create a chart or list of the options under consideration. Include the journals you read and receive; and the ones you respect. Ask your co-workers and colleagues what journals best fit the topic of your paper and have them weigh in on their opinions on the publications. In your chart, list these journal names and their urls. Most journal website will have an About section that will list the Mission or Aims and Scope of the publication. Read them and see if they align with your content and article format. Add to the chart the journal’s frequency; that is monthly, bimonthly, quarterly. Closely review the Information for Authors published for each Journal, likely at their website. This is the best guide to see if your article is a fit and will save everyone time. Read it very closely. Not just their mission but also the specifications for format and types of articles that are interested in. Also, if a journal has an Impact Factor, it may be listed at their website. If not, sometimes searching the web for that journal’s current Impact Factor will give you an answer. List whether the journal is subscription based, or sent to members of a Society, or an Open Access publication. Sometimes a journal may be more than one of these. If it is Open Access, check out the APC or Author Processing Charge and include the amount, if any. The more widely the journal is available, for example an Open Access publication, the more your article will get downloaded and read. Next check on where the journal is indexed. For instance, in medicine or nursing, being included in Medline or CINAHL are essential. Check for your area of specialty to see if the journal is covered in your key abstracting and indexing service. Once again, go the website and ensure articles are included online in addition to in the paper version of the journal. Are they posted online at acceptance or only when a print version appears? What may be listed at a website is the average time a paper takes to get from submission to decision and then the time it takes to get from acceptance to being published. If your topic has a sense of urgency to it, this time can be a critical decision. These times may not be publicly available. On occasion, the acceptance rate or rejection rate from the previous year may be listed. This would be a key piece of data as well. Search your topic over at a journal’s website to see if they have published any articles on it over the past two years. Most journals are looking for new or novel takes on existing topics and you might want to see what they have recently published. Finally, submit to just one journal at a time. I know it is tempting to reduce the wait time and send out to many journals or publications, but etiquette (and ethics) demand one at a time only.....
Views: 13896 John Bond
13 Tips for Writing a Great Journal Article
 
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13 TIPS FOR WRITING A GREAT JOURNAL ARTICLE: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting gives tips on writing a journal article. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I have 13 tips for writing a great academic article or paper. First, let us start before any writing has occurred. Think about whether the effort is justified. Is the topic new and novel in the field? Is the article about a particularly timely topic in your area? Don’t just write an article because you can; rather look to make a difference. Second, think about where you want to submit the manuscript. Be a loyal reader of any journal you intend to submit to; do not just pick one out of an online search. Know the mission of the publication. This will allow you to focus your writing on that journal. Third, follow the instruction or guidelines for authors for that journal very closely, particularly in regard to length and format. Now, let us look at mechanics. The fourth tip is to follow closely the appropriate style manual. Whether the AMA, APA, Chicago style guides, or others, you will benefit by understanding these guidelines in your field. Fifth, short and concise is always better. This applies to the entire manuscript but also to sentence length and paragraph length as well. No one ever said, “I wish that paper was longer.” Ruthlessly delete all extraneous materials. Sixth, follow accepted practices in regard to grammar and style. If you do not know the expected practices find someone that does. Also, read the articles in the journals you are submitting to so you can understand the tone of these articles. Now, let us look at the content presentation. Seventh, when the paper is written, review the abstract very, very closely. Many people will read only the abstract and it needs to be flawless. Make sure it conforms to the abstract format in your intended publication. Eight, consider the article title very carefully. Avoid a boring title which is really just a label. Consider something thought provoking or maybe even provocative, but do not stray so far that it is corny or sensational. Ninth, make sure any tables, charts, images, or graphics are essential and created in a quality fashion. Does each item standalone by itself? Lastly, let us consider the review of the manuscript before submission. My tenth tip is to read the final manuscript aloud several times. This helps for clarity and language. Eleventh, aside from having the content reviewed by your peers before submission, have others outside your field read the paper as well. Listen closely to any suggestions they have. Twelfth, avoid any hint of plagiarism. Always cite your sources. Never take any passage or ideas from others. An error here can affect your career or reputation. Finally, I know many people that watch these videos are non-English language speakers that may be submitting to an English language journal. If so, I suggest having a native English language colleague or speaker read and help craft the paper before submission. This will likely increase the quality of the final product and therefore increase the likelihood of acceptance. If you do not know anyone to help with this, there are many editorial services that will now assist for a fee. Or email me for suggestions of editors that can help with this. At the end of the day, there is no secret to success. Attention to detail and a careful review of the language will hopefully improve your work.
Views: 8177 John Bond
Should I Publish in an Open Access Journal?
 
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SHOULD I PUBLISH IN AN OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL? Deciding whether to publish in an Open Access journal or a traditional, subscription journal is an important one. This video details what points to consider when making this decision, in regard to scholarly publishing. MORE VIDEOS on deciding about publishing in an Open Access journal: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3jGxJAKviOyWjC4WuQc91Tu FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there, I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to be discussing if you should publish in an Open Access journal? For many authors or researchers, the first step in the publication process is deciding whether to publish in an Open Access journal or in a traditional subscription or closed publication. The idea is that Open Access will deliver more downloads, more readers, and therefore a wider exposure to their work. On the flip side, many Open Access journal charge a fee. Many are newer publications and may not have the cache of the some older, more established subscription or society publications have. As a reminder, Open Access means there are no barriers to accessing or reading the articles in a journal such as needing a subscription. There are also limited or no copyright restrictions to the articles. There are several models for Open Access or OA. Gold OA is the most common one. Under Gold OA, the journal may have various business models. One might be to charge an APC or Author Processing Charge which could range from several hundred dollars to several thousand dollars. FYI according to the Directory of Open Access Journals 60% of all OA journals don’t charge an APC fee to the author. Check out DOAJ.org which calls itself, “s a community-curated list of open access journals and aims to be the starting point for all information searches for quality, peer reviewed open access material.” Another model is Green OA. Under this model the author self-archives their article at a publicly available repository run by someone such as at a university. So, in deciding whether to go Open Access there are five decision points: First, is the journal an established and legitimate journal. Jeffrey Beall, a librarian from Colorado, has done a great work in identifying predatory publishers that accept basically all articles and do no peer review or work on the manuscript. They just charge an APC and post your material. Check if the journal you are considering is on his list of predatory publications. A link to this list is posted at the end of this video. To confirm the journal conforms to accepted practices you can also check the DOAJ site to see there are listed there, although some legitimate ones may not be on this voluntary list. Second, confirm the publication is peer reviewed. Peer review is the bed rock of quality research. Third, what metrics are used to measure the articles or publication against their peers. Does the journal have an Impact Factor? An H Index? Altmetrics or alternative metrics for its social media engagements or shares. If it has these or other metrics, how do the compare to other journals in their field? Fourth, check where the journal is indexed. Is it in Google Scholar, Medline, CINAHL, or whatever index applies to your individual field? The most important thing for the journal is exposure and indexing directly helps with that exposure. Finally, reputation is key. Ask your colleagues about any publication in your particular field and how it is perceived. Many Open Access are high quality publications ones and are leaders in their field. Whether to pay an APC, if they charge one, may be a deciding factor. At the end of the day, the reputation of the journal and how widely it is distributed or available to readers are the key decision points. These two factors are important and that is the decision point as whether to publish in Open Access or not. Well that’s it. Click here to subscribe to my YouTube channel or to see the playlist as to dealing with the decision point as to publishing in Open Access or not or leave me a comment below or send me an email. Thanks a lot and take care.
Views: 4631 John Bond
What is Sci-Hub?
 
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WHAT IS SCI-HUB?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses the website Sci-Hub. MORE VIDEOS on SCI-HUB can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3iCRLxx7nfTVtInVeVVMGJE See the Scholarly Kitchen at sspnet.org for articles on Sci-Hub. Also read the Science Magazine article: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/04/whos-downloading-pirated-papers-everyone FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ Transcript Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to discuss Sci-Hub, the online search engine that provides academic articles for direct download for free. Sci-Hub was launched in 2011 by Kazakhstan graduate student Alexandra Elbakyan. Since then Sci-Hub has been at the center of controversy and legal battles. Sci-Hub offers over 58,000,000 articles free to users by bypassing publisher’s paywalls, illegally. New articles are uploaded daily, perhaps by access through educational institutional proxies. Sci-Hub has been the subject of numerous lawsuits, most notably by Elsevier. Starting in 2015, a complaint was filed against the original domain. Following the loss of the domain, Sci-Hub has used several other domains, some of which have been blocked in certain countries. Despite these efforts, the site remains active but sometimes requires additional steps to access including the option of a direct IP address. In April 2016, Elbakyan told Science magazine that many academics from around the world donate their credentials, while publishers have claimed that Sci-Hub relies on credentials obtained by illegal means. Sci-Hub also began collaborating with Library Genesis or LibGen, a repository of educational books and documents in Russia. The Sci-Hub site is financed by user donations paid in bitcoins. The website has widespread popularity in both developed and developing countries including the United States, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, China, Russia, Brazil, and the whole European Union. The goal of Elbakyan has been to spread knowledge by allowing more people to access paywalled content. Elbakyan has cited the UN Declaration of Human Rights "to share in scientific advancement and its benefits" as her rationale. She claims the content is hindered by publishers demanding excessive payment for content which is written and donated by researchers. Sci-Hub has been compared to, among others, Napster and Edward Snowden. There are some great discussions about Sci-Hub: see the Scholarly Kitchen at sspnet.org for several great articles from the publisher’s point of view. Also, see Science magazine in April 2016 for another valuable article, “Who's downloading pirated papers? Everyone” which is worth the read. And most importantly read the comments at the end of all of these articles to get a flavor of the passion out there on the researchers and readers side. I’ll post a link to these in the comments below this video. All publishers with a paywall or that require login for membership are being affected by Sci-Hub today, whether they know it or not. Sci-Hub conversely does not appear to be going anywhere, anytime soon. This situation will continue to be followed closely as this push and pull over fair access to academic knowledge and the right to monetize a product are debated. Well that’s it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more videos about Sci-Hub. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 5611 John Bond
What are Preprints?
 
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WHAT ARE PREPRINTS?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses preprints. Lists of Preprint Repositories by Discipline: http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/Disciplinary_repositories or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disciplinary_repository List of journals that do and do not accept preprint submissions (check each site though): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_academic_journals_by_preprint_policy MORE VIDEOS on PREPRINTS can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3hbOyG4rl7SveTy_jCt_vnO FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to discuss preprints. In scholarly publishing, a preprint is a version of a paper that is posted at a repository and likely precedes publication in a peer-reviewed journal. The preprint allows early exposure of the work and allows for discourse about the findings of the paper earlier than the 6 to 12 to 18 months it might take to get the paper reviewed and accepted in a scholarly journal. Using one of the preprint services is very straight forward. The author posts the complete paper and appropriate figures etc. in one of the standard formats. This procedure is very similar to uploading a paper to a journal’s website for consideration for peer review. Some points to consider about preprints. First and most important is that the material is not peer reviewed. Next, an author may still (and will likely) pursue publication in a journal. Most journals will still consider articles posted in these repositories, but a small group of journals will not. I will post some links below to lists of which journals will not consider a preprint; but check with the journal’s policies. Also, preprints usually do not count toward tenure. Finally, the posted paper will persist even after an article is published in a journal. Because of this lag time journals may take to peer review manuscripts and the desire for peer feedback, preprint services have seen impressive growth in the number of services or repositories and the number of posted of papers. The popularity for a preprint services is many times credited to arXiv. arXiv was created by Paul Ginsparg in 1991 at Los Alamos National Laboratory for distributing theoretical high-energy physics preprints. arXiv is now a force to be reckoned with in academia and scholarly communications, as over 8,000 papers a month are posted with there, as of 2016, according to their statistics. The success has led to many other such hard science repositories such as engrXiv and bioRxiv and many others. In 2016, SocArXiv debuted in the social science arena. There are many other preprint services; too many to list here. There are some great lists by discipline. I will also post links in the notes below. And there are more debuting all the time such as Peer J’s Preprints, preprint.org and Figshare to name a few. Helping with this growth is the fact that several large non-profits are supporting preprint repositories both in a funding and recognizing the content in awarding grants. Preprints have had a significant impact on research and scholarly pursuits, particularly in the open science and open access era. A continued recognition over this content not being peer reviewed is very important. The role these repositories will play in scholarly communication and in publishing will continue to evolve. Having these papers assigned a doi (or digital object identifier), be in CrossRef, fully indexed, and noted as not peer reviewed with search engine results will be essential. Well that’s it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more videos about preprints. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 1033 John Bond
What is a DOI (or digital object identifier)?
 
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WHAT IS A DOI: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting explains what a DOI (or digital object identifier) is. MORE VIDEOS on DOIs can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3j32twDKbkeAKNN9FuY7Vlq FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to give a brief explanation of DOI or digital object identifier. A DOI is a unique identifier for electronic documents such as a journal article. It is a set of numbers, letters, and/or symbols. Here is an example of what the DOI or digital object identifier looks like for the JAMA article that President Obama wrote. (doi:10.1001/jama.2016.9797) DOIs are most commonly associated, as I said, with journal articles, but they can represent a range of other content such as an individual table or figure, a white paper, a book chapter, research data sets, and many other items. DOIs are most commonly found on the first or main page of a journal article, or the particular item. DOIs are so pervasive now with well-respected journals, one rarely has to hunt to find one. Finding one for an article that you don’t have access to, is usually addressed by a quick web search using the article title and the letters DOI. The DOI is split into two parts: the prefix which indicates the registrant and the suffix which is chosen by the registrant for that item. Stored in association with the DOI is metadata for the item, including its URL. Using a DOI when referring to an item is more predictable or persistent than using the URL, as many times URLs may change. The DOI system began in 2000 and is managed by the International DOI Foundation and its affiliates. According to DOI.org, as of 2017, there are 133 million DOI names assigned and over 5 billion DOI resolutions per year. Go to DOI.org or CrossRef.org for a wealth of other information. Well that’s it. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click to see a playlist for more videos on DOIs. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank you very much and take care.
Views: 2088 John Bond
What is Orcid ID?
 
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WHAT IS ORCID ID? How do you apply for one? What are the benefits? What activities can be added? Does it help my research and publishing career? This short video gives a quick overview of these terms as they relate to scholarly publishing. MORE VIDEOS on Orcid ID: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3gbwvssyTeXIRJfsD0S56dn FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there, I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to give an overview of Orcid ID. Orcid ID is a system to identify scientific and scholarly authors and contributors. Orcid ID can help distinguish between people with the same name, or help identify people whose name may appear differently over time or from one project to another. It also helps to address cultural differences with how names are presented. This unique and persistent identifier can also help bring all the work that a scholar has been associated with into one definitive place. Orcid means Open Researcher and Contributor ID To apply, an author or researcher would register at Orcid.org, a non-profit organization. There is no fee. The person would be assigned a unique 16-digit number. The person would also give some brief biographical information such as education and employment and then link to or list published works or grants received. The person would set their privacy preference and then round out their profile. From there on out, they would use their Orcid ID number with publishers, repositories, journals, funding bodies, associations, universities, research groups, and governments. They would use it when applying for or receiving a grant or publishing a paper or 30 plus other scholarly endeavors or events. As the person, would move through their career, changing jobs or locations, or even names, the Orcid ID would help keep track of the complete list of their works. A side benefit is that it could reduce the amount of paperwork, cause less confusion, and be a more accurate profile of who the person is because of this more complete record; all the while remaining unique to that person. It is essentially an ISBN or doi (digital object identifier) for a person. Orcid says there 2.5 million live Orcid IDs right now. The numbers will continue to grow, likely exponentially. No author and researcher should be without one and shortly almost all scholarly publications and funding bodies will require one. Well that’s it. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or see the link below for my playlist of more videos on ORCID ID. And make comments below or email me with comments. Thank you very much and take care.
Views: 2235 John Bond
How to Find an Impact Factor
 
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HOW TO FIND AN IMPACT FACTOR: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting gives a quick quick explanation of the quickest ways to find a Journal's Impact Factor. MORE VIDEOS on Finding a Journal's Impact Factor see my Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3jAAssDubktiCv7zGEHuAxM FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to discuss how to find the Impact Factor for a Journal. A reminder, Impact Factor is a metric reflecting the average number of citations of recent articles published in that peer review journal. Impact Factor is calculated from the Journal Citation Report or JCR published by Clarivate Analytics. Impact Factor was formerly owned by Thomson Reuters. It is derived from the Science Citation Index and the Social Science Citation Index. It covers about 11,000 journals from about 2,500 publishers. The Impact Factor of a journal is the number of citations received in that year by articles published in that journal during the two preceding years, divided by the total number of articles published in that journal during the two preceding years. See my other YouTube video for more on calculating Impact Factor including an example. There are two paths to finding an Impact factor. First, if you don’t have access to an academic library than the easiest way to find it is by Googling the name of journal and the words Impact factor. Many times, it will be listed on the search results page, but you will want to ensure it is the current one. Click through to the journal’s home page and when you are there, go the About section. I searched ten scholarly journals. Nine listed the Impact Factor on the search results page, but not always the most recent one. All ten however, listed the current Impact Factor on the About page. What is not listed on most About pages is a journal’s 5 Year Impact Factor or how it ranks compared to other journals in the field, both helpful metrics. Now if you are looking for several journals, that can be a lot of searching and clicking around. The good news is if you have access to an academic library, it is much easier. So, the second way to find Impact Factors is to log onto the academic library system you are connected with and look for either: databases or the Web of Science which contains some of the information in the Journal Citation Report. If databases are listed, you can either search for Journal Citation Report and then just click on Science Citation Index and then search for the journal you are interested in and its Impact Factor. Or if databases are not listed, check if the Web of Science is in your library’s offerings, then go to the search bar. Enter the name of the journal and change the drop down to Publication Name. Click on any random article, scroll to the bottom of that page and look for Journal Citation Report. Click there and your will see a host of information and data about the publication. See this playlist of other videos about finding an Impact Factor including ones with screen shots. Well that’s it. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank you very much and take care.
Views: 3566 John Bond
What is a Review Article?
 
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WHAT IS A REVIEW ARTICLE?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses Review Articles or Lit Reviews. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPTS Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going talking about Review Articles. A Review Article is one that summarizes the current state of knowledge about a topic or an idea. In academic publishing, it usually summarizes published studies or articles about that topic. Typically, it does not report new findings or new facts. Sometimes Review Articles are also known as Literature Review or a Lit Review Article, or sometimes Survey Articles. Many scholarly journals will include the Review Article format as an option for publication. Some journals are solely devoted to the format and they are called Review Journals. Many times, journals prefer to solicit Review Articles from specific invited authors who are experts in that field as opposed to having them be considered unsolicited. Review Articles are primarily literature reviews and therefore are considered secondary sources since they do not contain original research or findings. They center on the key articles or literature to understanding that topic. These articles can become some of the most read/most downloaded articles for a journal as readers may turn to them time-and-time again to fully appreciate the topic and the seminal literature connected to it. Journals that try to cultivate a high Impact Factor may intentionally include these articles for the reason of them being highly cited. Review Articles, aside from being a source of a definitive literature review, also help identify gaps in research, focus on topics still under debate, and help to point towards where future research might concentrate its efforts. One of the most valuable goals a Review Article can have is to draw connections between the articles mentioned or the studies examined. Authors writing Review Articles should not shy away from drawing conclusions as the articles are not simply bibliography. Review Articles or Literature Review Articles will remain a mainstay of scholarly communications and research. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist or more videos about academic publishing. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 1948 John Bond
What is Academic Publishing?
 
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WHAT IS ACADEMIC PUBLISHING?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting defines academic publishing. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com MORE VIDEOS on what Academic Publishing is can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3icGmNLx9Wk6eUyeeTRR0uM JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPTHi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to give a broad overview of what is scholarly or academic publishing. To start with publishing is the broad term for the dissemination of knowledge. Traditional publishing can take many forms: books, monographs, or textbooks; journals or magazines; newspapers. All of these may now be in paper or electronic form or both. Now education or information can be in many other forms: videos, podcasts, learning modules, webinars, and many, many more. This knowledge can be distributed for free or at a cost, such as purchasing a product or via a subscription. The traditional steps of publishing are: product or content acquisitions, copy editing, production or page make up, printing or posting in the appropriate electronic form, and then marketing and distribution. Academic or scholarly publishing is an important part of publishing. The goal of scholarly publishing is to disseminate academic research and scholarship. The traditional ways have been through journals and books, but increasing other avenues exist as well. A few points distinguish scholarly publishing from general or trade publishing. First is peer review whereby experts in the field review the content to ensure accuracy and to determine the material advances the field of study. This helps a journal or the like be selective and that it ensures that quality content is published. Scholarly publishing many times is very specialized. An important trend in scholarly publishing is open access, whereby the content is free to almost anyone with internet access. The author or a funder pays for the publication of the material and there usually are few restrictions on its use or reuse. An incredible amount of content is created each year in academic publishing. There are perhaps 35,000 peer review journals in the world today that publish between two and two and half million peer reviewed articles each year. What qualifies as a publisher is now broader than ever before. Traditionally for-profit publishers, associations or societies, university presses and some others covered the constellation of groups that published content. Now open access organizations like PLOS or BioMed Central, content aggregators, websites, video channels like YouTube, social media sites, and many, many others count themselves rightly as publishers. In scholarly publishing, there may be between 2,000 to 3,000 or organizations publishing or creating content today, depending on how they are counted. How publishers describe themselves reflects the changing times. Elsevier, a large publisher, tags itself as “An Information Analytics Company, Empowering Knowledge.” Another publisher, Wolters Kluwer, says it “provides information, software, and services.” And Wiley says it is a global provider of “content-enabled solutions to improve outcomes in research, education and professional practice.” Note none of these say publish, books, or journals in their description. And things will only continue to evolve and change even more. Thank heavens.
Views: 1195 John Bond
DRM in Book Publishing
 
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DRM AND BOOK PUBLISHING: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting gives a quick overview of digital rights management in book publishing. MORE VIDEOS on Digital Rights Management in Book Publishing: www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3j-cFvPfHOKFOekyOsvUj6K FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to discuss DRM or Digital Rights Management. I will be discussing how it relates to book publishing. DRM can be a confusing topic and it certainly provokes strong feelings with many people. First DRM is a form of protection used with eBooks that limits the reader or buyer with their ability to copy it or to share it with others. DRM is widely used in the book publishing industry, as it is in the music, film, gaming, and other creative industries. Companies such as Amazon, Apple, Google, Barnes and Noble all limit the buyer’s ability to share the work with others. DRM works by having embedded code or programming tie the exact content to a user’s account or to a particular device. Some DRM programs allow the user to share or copy content with a specific number of people or times. Others allow no sharing. According to its advocates, the goal of DRM is to prevent illegal sharing or piracy which might deprive an author or publisher from sales or royalties. There is very restrictive DRM that requires the user to be online the whole time while reading; less restrictive ones which are more liberal with copying and sharing; watermarking which is less invasive but pulls on the reader’s conscience to play by the content’s stated rules; and all the way down to those companies that impose no restrictions on the material. The arguments for DRM are that the material costs money or time to create and therefore people should have to pay for it. It also shows the reader that the company views the content as having value and therefore requires payment, versus free content on a let’s say a website. There is a vocal group that is stridently anti-DRM. Some of the points they make are: -DRM costs money and adds to the product costs. -DRM causes aggravation to the user and leads to frustration among buyers or readers, even if you want to do such innocent things as read on multiple devices or make a backup copy. -DRM prevents legitimate sales because of the hoops that are usually required. -And most of all that they are pointless as they are always work arounds or hacks. Whether pro or con, it becomes an individual or institutional decision. There are conflicting studies that say when books are free of DRM, sales increases. That pirating does not have a negative effect on eBooks sales. And there are other studies that say the reverse. The decision may be decided already for you, in that, if you are going to use a large distribution channel like Amazon or Apple or others, they require DRM. However, you may be able to dial back some of the choices on how restrictive they are. When you have to make a decision about using DRM and how restrictive to make the copying and sharing options, I would suggest think through the paper book parallel. That is would an owner of a paper copy be able to do the things you are trying to restrict the eBook owner from doing.....
Views: 1218 John Bond
What is Scopus?
 
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WHAT IS SCOPUS? This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses the abstracting and indexing service Scopus. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about Scopus. Scopus is an abstract and citation database launched in 2004. It covers the fields of science, technology, medicine, social sciences, and the arts and humanities. It covers various formats of sources, Books and Book Series, Peer Reviewed Journals, Trade Journals, Conference Papers, and other formats. It is used by authors, researchers, students, librarians, universities, and a host of others to find, locate, and evaluate the research output from around the world. Scopus is a subscription service. According to Scopus, it includes: 64 million records. 21,548 journal titles. 5,000 publishers. 131,000 books including monographs. 7.5 million Conference papers. 320 trade publications and other content. All material covered in the database are reviewed each year to ensure quality standards are maintained. Scopus gives four types of quality measure for each title; those are h-Index, CiteScore, SCImago Journal Rank, and Source Normalized Impact per Paper or SNIP. Scopus offers author profiles which cover academic affiliations, number of publications and their bibliographic data, references, and details on the number of citations each document has received. It has an alert feature that allows users to track changes to a profile, as well as make changes themselves. Scopus IDs for authors are also integrated with ORCID. Since Scopus is owned by Elsevier, an independent Scopus Content Selection and Advisory Board was established to prevent a potential conflict of interest in the choice of journals to be included in the database. The board consists of scientists and subject librarians. Scopus is one of many multidisciplinary abstracting and indexing services, and certainly one of the largest and most prominent. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me at RiverwindsConsulting.com with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist or more videos from Riverwinds Consulting. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 609 John Bond
What is the h-index?
 
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What is the h-index? This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses h-index. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about h-index. The h-index is an author-level metric that measures both the productivity and citation impact of the publications by an author or researcher or group. The index is based on the set of the author’s most cited papers and the number of citations that they have received in other publications. The index can also be applied to the productivity and impact of a scholarly journal as well as to a group such as a university department. The index was suggested by Jorge Hirsch of UCSD in 2005. It is sometimes called the Hirsch index or Hirsch number. The h-index is intended to measure simultaneously the quality and quantity of research and authorship output. Hirsch meant the index to address the disadvantages of other bibliometric indicators, such as the total number of papers or the total number of citations. It is considered by some to be the most widely used quantitative measure of impact by an author or group. The definition of the index is that a scholar with an index of h has published h papers each of which has been cited in other papers at least h times. For example, an h-index of 12 would mean that out of all the publications by a group or person, 12 articles would have received at least 12 citations each. The index is designed to improve upon other simpler measures such as the total number of citations or publications. The index is most properly applied for comparisons with authors or scientists or groups working in the same field. Databases such as Scopus or the Web of Knowledge provide automated h-index calculators. Google Scholar provides an automatically-calculated h-index within a Google Scholar profile. The h-index of course has drawbacks and critics. It does not adequately cover foreign language publication and does not include most citations in non-journal publications. Most literature prior to 1996 is not well covered and the index is database dependent. The index is difficult to use to compare authors at different stages of a career such as a young researcher versus a veteran. The h-index will not decrease, even after a career is over. Finally, the value of each h-index is specific in that discipline. The comparisons are difficult to use from one area to another. Despite these faults, the h-index has value and represents the natural inclination to want to quantify various challenges such as the comparison between research institutions and the like. But at the end of the day, the impact of the work on society is the real measure, and that is likely subjective. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me at RiverwindsConsulting.com with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist or more videos from Riverwinds Consulting. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 721 John Bond
How to Write an Abstract
 
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HOW TO WRITE AN ABSTRACT: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses Writing and Abstract. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com MORE VIDEOS on Writing an Abstract can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3jdQyeMv5RuaYEXYQ-IQZJV JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to discuss how to write an abstract for a journal article. An abstract provides a reader with a very brief representation of the information contained in a research paper, a journal article, or other academic communication. It helps the reader determine if the article or paper is of interest or relevant to them. There are several types including structured abstracts, informative abstracts, descriptive abstracts, and others. The length of an abstract may vary from 100 to 200 words or perhaps longer. Many times, the maximum length or format is dictated by the publication, or group being submitted to, or by a preferred style guide such as APA, MLA, or Chicago Style Manual. An abstract typically contains four parts: the research focus or the problem being addressed; the research methods being used; the results or findings of the research; and the conclusions. Here are the steps to writing an abstract: first, write the entire article or paper. Next choose the main or key points of the paper. This will help you focus on the key takeaways. Look specifically to create a one sentence purpose or thesis statement to what is being examined or researched. Next, state succinctly what methods were employed. Then give the findings or results of the work, with a brief conclusion which should concisely recap the results. FYI references, tables, figures usually are not included in an abstract. These few sentences will come together to form the abstract for your paper; its presentation dependent upon which format you are using. Do not use text directly from the paper. An abstract is derivative, not cut and paste from the paper. Here are some pointers: -Concise is best. If it can be below the maximum word count, then so be it. -Don’t duplicate the opening paragraphs of the paper; these serve different functions. -Avoid jargon. Use language your readers would expect. -Make sure essential key words are present so search engines or abstracting and indexing services will understand better what your paper is about. -Write in the present tense. -Don’t hold back on the findings to tease the reader. Put them out there for the world to see. -Proofread, proofread, proofread. -Also, show the abstract to colleagues, inside and outside the profession, for feedback. -And finally, an article abstract is likely to appear in many databases or other places since it is fair use. Make sure it stands alone. And remember reading an abstract is not the equivalent of having read the full article. Well that’s it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more videos on writing an abstract. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 1761 John Bond
Single Blind or Double Blind Peer Review in Publishing?
 
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WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SINGLE BLIND AND DOUBLE BLIND PEER REVIEW IN SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses the differences between these two types of peer review systems. MORE VIDEOS on PEER REVIEW can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3iYB7cqK8OSGmVKzZJwRBS8 FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to discuss the difference between single blind and double blind peer review as it relates to scholarly publishing. As a reminder, peer review is the evaluation of a scholarly article by the editors, editorial board, and the reviewers of a journal to determine if the article is worthy of publication. Journals may operate under many different types of systems but single blind and double blind peer review are the most common. In single blind peer review, the authors are not privy to the names of the peer reviewers. In this version, reviewers being anonymous allows for them to be honest in their opinion of the content when giving their feedback to the journal. Authors may be concerned that the reviewer’s knowledge of who the author and the institution are may lead to bias in the critique. Single blind, however, is the most common type of all the systems particularly in STM publishing. In double blind peer review, both the author and reviewers are anonymous. The author takes the time to anonymize their article, deleting all references to the author and their institution. Sometimes, however, this anonymizing may be done by the journal’s editorial staff. In this system, the reviewers are focused on the content and, extraneous information such as the institution or county of origin or how well known the author is, does not interfere in the process. A consideration with double blind peer review is that by definition the reviewers are subject matter experts on the topic of the paper and they can sometimes take an educated guess as to who the authors or where the work was done. Aside from single and double blind is the concept of open review. This is when the authors and reviewers know who each other are. On the plus side, it leads to a more transparent process. On the downside, some fear that politeness or political correctness on the reviewers may lead to reserved criticism, allowing inferior material to move forward into the publication process. Open review, while practiced by some notable publications, is not wide spread at this time. The debate continues whether single blind or double blind is the most optimal form of peer review. A quick search of the web will yield several interesting studies about the benefits or disadvantages of either one, as well as lots of personal commentary. Human nature and a natural bias toward a specific topic or practice will make either single blind or double blind potentially flawed. A complete lack of conflicts of interest cannot be avoided because the reviewers are people. Whether single or double blind, the best an author can do is choose a well-respected journal that they are familiar with and submit meaningful work that is well written. After that, it is up to the editor and the editorial board to facilitate a meaningful peer review that is free of bias, conflict of interest, or agenda peddling. This includes maintaining a well-respected board of experts that are current in their fields and know what is expected of them when they provide a peer review. Well that’s it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more videos about peer review. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 662 John Bond
What is Predatory Publishing?
 
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WHAT IS PREDATORY PUBLISHING? How does it relates to Open Access. How do I avoid predatory journals? This short video gives a quick overview of these terms as they relate to scholarly publishing. MORE VIDEOS on Predatory Publishing: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3hmdstctVjsHj6zB7Sxw8yN FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi. This is John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to give an overview of predatory publishing. Predatory publishing is when an author pays to publish an article and the publisher or the journal provides little or no services. Predatory publishing is most closely associated with open access. A reminder, open access has two factors. One where the material is free of any barriers to access which means its available to anyone, anywhere, at any time. Also there are few or no limitations to its use such as a a copyright restriction. OA authors usually pay APC, or Author Processing Charge when their article is accepted for publication. This fee may be several hundred dollars all the way up $3,000 or even higher. This is where the predatory part comes in. As the industry started to migrate from the subscription model to the author pays model some outright illegal or unethical practices started to emerge. Typically, a journal would receive a scholarly article and have it peer reviewed. If the article met the journal’s quality standards and guidelines, then the journal might accept that article. Once accepted, it might be professionally edited and a format or layout applied to it. The author would see these changes and, once approved, the article would be published and posted online. A predatory journal might have a very high acceptance rate, perhaps 100%. The article might never have been peer reviewed. Also, a human may never have read the article or edited it. The original manuscript might be used instead of a typeset or formatted version. And the author might never have seen any of the changes or, in this case, the lack of them. Predatory journals are concentrating more on the money aspect of OA then on the quality or how the discipline is being furthered. So how do you spot a predatory publisher? Jeffrey Beall, a librarian at the University of Colorado, has been instrumental in identifying these journals and these publishers. A link to the list he created is listed at the end of this video. Here are some other ways to spot predatory publishers: Is the journal very aggressive in asking you to submit an article? Check with your colleagues about the reputation of the publication. Read some articles online and look at the quality yourself. Do you recognize colleagues or institutions that are familiar to you? How are the articles edited? Are they relatively error free? How about the website? Is it user-friendly? And finally, with the editorial board, are there people you recognize on there? If you continue to have doubts, feel free to reach out to one you may know, or know of, and ask their opinion of the publication and how often they review for the publication. At the end of the day, quality and peer review are key. More on that later. Well that’s it. Click on the link here to subscribe to my YouTube channel or to see more videos discussing predatory publishing. And leave a comment below or send me an email. Thank you very much and take care.
Views: 1579 John Bond
Cabell's Whitelist and Blacklist Services
 
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CABELL'S WHITELIST AND BLACKLIST: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses Cabell's Whitelist and Blacklist services. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com MORE VIDEOS on can be found at Cabell's Whitelist and Blacklist services: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3iHqLjO0bgMD_Izt3IGjUtp JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps/ Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps/ SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about Cabell’s Whitelist and Blacklist services. Cabell’s International is a privately-owned company founded in 1978 that serves the scholarly or academic library and publishing industries. Two products they offer for subscription are their Whitelist and the Blacklist directories. The Whitelist is “an independent, curated database of scholarly journals that guides researchers, publishers, librarians, academics, and administrators to the publications they need. The Whitelist provides complete contact and publication information, multiple quality metrics, submission experience data, and peer review indicators for over 11,000 verified journals across 18 academic disciplines.” The Whitelist in addition provides tools and metrics to help researchers with the decisions on which journal to submit a paper or to evaluate a publication. They also provide Journal Impact Factors, Altmetrics Reports, and a full range of Scopus citation-backed metrics. The journals are selected by Cabell’s and reviewed at least once a year. Some of the information presented is publicly available while a small amount is self-reported by the publication. The Whitelist is an invaluable service that institutions and researchers can rely on for accurate information on the important publications in a market.
Views: 513 John Bond
What is a Monograph?
 
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WHAT IS A MONOGRAPH?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses Monographs. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com MORE VIDEOS on Monographs can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3ji5IP_ujyMdmgTaTQXvMer JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to go discuss the broadest of topics: what is a monograph? A monograph, to many people, is another name for a book. A monograph is scholarly a work usually on a single topic. Many times, it is written by one author. It is always non-fiction. A monograph differs from a textbook which is a book used by students for a particular area of study. Unlike a textbook, the purpose of a monograph is to present research or scholarship on a topic. This research is different from an article in several ways, but most notably is a monograph is much longer. There is probably no consensus as to length, but a range might be 25,000 to 75,000 words, plus images and tables. A monograph is usually a single installment and not a multi-volume or periodic series. Monographs many times are a sign of academic advancement by the author as their career and research progresses. Other individuals in a field and libraries are usually considered the prime markets for monographs, but that is changing. Textbooks on the other hand, are required by an instructor or professor and discuss and encompass an area of study for a students’ use. The student may either receive the textbook from the institution or purchase it themselves. The growing costs of textbooks has become a concern to many. Returning to monographs, they traditionally were presented in print form; and then print and eBook form. Now increasingly they are eBook only. They also can also be offered in large eBook collections or databases that institutions might subscribe to. The print version might also be available through a print-on-demand option. Another trend has been toward open access monographs. Most researchers primary interest is the widest dissemination of their work. Open access allows for this, with few barriers to access. The stumbling block for the growth of OA monographs is the required funding by the author to finance its creation. As the publishing word changes, monographs and scholarly books will evolve as well. Lengths, formats, and their digital presentation will continue to reflect the rapidly changing world to adapt to researchers and readers’ needs. Well that’s it. I’ve released a new eBook called, “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process.” It is a short, focused guide to this essential business task that associations or societies use to find potential publishing partners. See the link in the notes below for more information on the book or how to purchase it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more videos about monographs. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 5266 John Bond
Books Rights and Licensing
 
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BOOKS RIGHTS AND LICENSING. How does a publisher go about licensing the rights to a book to an international publisher for a translated edition. John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses the basic steps. MORE VIDEOS on Book Rights and Licensing: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3inJ7hXWk6S4c0N7UYlmTqf FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there, I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to discuss the basics of licensing the rights to a book or product in scholarly publishing to an international publisher for a translated edition. The essence of rights deals is that a company licenses the rights to publish a different language version of your work in their language or region. You are paid a modest one-time fee or royalty and do no work and make no investment. The translating company does all the work and takes all the risks or reaps all the reward. Likely, your company would still be able to sell the original language edition in this region. For this discussion, I am going to assume we are discussing an American scholarly publisher licensing translation rights for a book or monograph to an international publisher for that company to republish in their native language. As a scholarly publisher, the first question to ask is who in your office will do the work. It may be done through your marketing department, through business development, editorial departments, or other places. Have all efforts concentrated with one group and refer all inquiries there. Also, some publishers use an agent as the intermediary. Many times, an agent will know about a market than an employee who might have this as a part of their job. As a first step, I’d suggest you consider your motivations for pursuing international editions of your books. Is it for additional revenue, or to help you promote the original edition you published? Perhaps the author or editor has a high interest in having their work be available in other countries or other languages. Or maybe you want to spread the word about the topic of the material and increase the exposure to the content. Either way, knowing your motivations is very helpful. Next is to understand what you have available to sell. All your books’ metadata should be listed in one spreadsheet. Appropriate bibliographic information for each title should be included, such as author, title, ISBN, format, and physical specifications, and so on. This document will grow and expand as the categories increase. Next is confirming your organization holds all the rights to the material. Check your contracts that you own all rights, in all languages, in all formats, worldwide. Assuming you do, confirm there is no material in the book (let’s say a figure or table) that was reprinted with permission from a third party. If there was, you will need to note this and convey this limitation to future interested parties. Let’s assume you have no reprinted material. Next create brief marketing materials that explain your company or organization. Note the key titles and offer a complete list. An informative one or two-page PDF will serve the purpose. Now you will need to create a list of potential publishers to contact by region or language. You may know these publishers already, or your authors may know of them. An internet search might work, that is “medical publishers in Spain” or “science publishers in Italy.” A final source is looking at who exhibits at the Frankfurt Book Fair. This large convention in Frankfurt, Germany is where most international publishers gather in one place. Check out what companies attend this convention. Next contact these publishers with an email or call about their interest in having them considering your books for possible translation. Explain your interest, and discuss the newest or not yet released title. Include any promotional material......
Views: 966 John Bond
2018 Trends in Scholarly Publishing
 
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TRENDS IN SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING FOR 2018: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting some of the trends in publishing in 2018. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPTS Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about the trends in scholarly publishing for 2018. The academic publishing world continues to be buffeted by change. Whether this is positive or negative is in the eye of the beholder. Here is a random list of the key topics presenting opportunities and threats to the world of publishing. First, open access will evolve further. The players will continue to change as the commercialization of OA affects how it is perceived. Services connected to open access will expand. Key players may merge, be bought, or change their model. Second, preprints will continue to change the landscape of publishing. The more preprints are accepted in scholarly publishing and in academia, the more the subscription and OA models will be changed in regard to their perceived value. Third, will be an ongoing concern about the economy and its effect on scholarly publishing. Whether it is a market correction in 2018, change in government funding in the US and the trickle-down affect (or assault) on library budgets, or continue Mergers and Acquisitions activity; business and financial issues will stay on the front of people’s minds. Fourth, voice search will make inroads into scholarly publishing specifically with intelligent personal assistants like Siri, Alexa, and a growing list. Publishers will need to be vigilant in their preparation of their content and SEO procedures for the future in the world of voice search. Fifth, Sci-Hub will remain in the news and cause disruption. Woe to those publishers that are not thinking through authentication as well as how to deal with these types of services. Sixth, delivering content in video and audio form will grow with customer demand. Many publishers are using innovative ways to deliver journal abstracts, news articles, continuing education to mobile customers and readers as the usage numbers are skyrocketing. Seventh, machine learning will increase in the impact on scholarly content. Publishers will find opportunities with machine learning and artificial intelligence to partner with research institutions and others to create innovative non-book or journal products. And there many more I could discuss. How will the net-neutrality fight affect publishers? Also, topics such as workflows, accessibility for content, increased services provided by publishers will all present opportunities for publishing. How will it all turn out? Stay tuned over the next 12 months. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more of my videos. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 776 John Bond
What is Google Scholar?
 
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What is Google Scholar? This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses Google Scholar. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about Google Scholar. Google Scholar is a search engine that indexes scholarly literature across many disciplines and formats. Google Scholar was launched in 2004. It includes peer-reviewed academic journals, books and monographs, conference papers, theses and dissertations, preprints, abstracts, technical reports, and other formats. It reportedly contains the full text or metadata of more than 160 million documents, as of 2014. Some of the features of Google Scholar include: a citation importing feature for supporting bibliography managers; being able to save search results; being able to view an Impact Factor of some journals; the ability to search for digital or physical copies of articles, whether online or in libraries; and linking to online availability of cited content. In 2012, Google Scholar created "Scholar Citations profiles", or author profiles that are editable by authors themselves and that link to their indexed work. Google Scholar separately includes a legal database of US cases which inserts Westlaw and LexisNexis style page numbers in line with the text of the case. Google Scholar also has its detractors. The topics of concern are: lack of screening for quality and including predatory open access material; listing content in incorrect disciplines; vulnerability to spam; an incomplete listing of all major scholarly publications; and more. Most recently people have been observing major publishers and databases performing Academic Search Engine Optimization, as a way to optimize placement in such places as Google Scholar. This brings a host of other potentially negative issues. Nonetheless, Google Scholar will continue to grow in importance with users and there are concerns that it will replace, in the minds of many, other more scholarly options. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me at RiverwindsConsulting.com with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist or more videos from Riverwinds Consulting. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 531 John Bond
What is Metadata?
 
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WHAT IS METADATA?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses metadata in scholarly publishing. MORE VIDEOS on metadata can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3hVVC96f9I5YUnIZGLSLs6N FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to discuss metadata in academic publishing. In a recent survey, improving metadata was the top business priority for scholarly publishing executives this year. Metadata, as we know, is data about data. It is more than just keywords. High quality metadata is essential for properly structuring a website or digital product and most importantly, for discoverability by search engines. It provides for the digital identification of content, and supports the archiving of this content. It is also essential for good business decisions for organizational growth and product development. Metadata can be divided into several types, some of which might include: Structural metadata, Descriptive metadata, Technical metadata, Administrative metadata, Rights metadata, and other categories. Whether discussing journals, books, databases, or other educational products, having your metadata house in order is essential. First, following commonly accepted XML tagging practices is a must. While a publisher may offer its content at its own website, ultimately the content is used and processed by many third parties and therefore complying with standards from CrossRef, PubMed, ORCID, Google Scholar, Amazon, and many others including other abstracting and indexing organizations, is essential. Using industry accepted tagging practices, will make the content much more accessible and increase sales. And well-structured metadata, in and of itself, may have commercial value, past the advertising value. Second, automating and streamlining internal metadata practices is an important task for the publishers’ leadership to be involved with and knowledgeable about, and not just delegate. Avoid homebrewing your metadata in-house with an individual or group of individuals. While this may seem economical, it will cost in the long run. Perhaps use metadata management software or, better yet, a metadata partner. Best of all is to have this software or partner be specific to scholarly publishing. The costs will outweigh the benefits. Ongoing changes to standards such as XML, JATS, ONIX, BISAC, the Dublin Core, and many others will tax the resources of even large organizations. Working with a metadata management partner will help the publisher stay up to date with these changes. Other benefits include: reducing staff time by not creating conflicting or duplicate metadata; the creation of higher quality metadata; reaching more readers/customers/partner;, adhering to best practices; potentially increasing sales; and more. An audit of your current and legacy products will show if there is room for improvement. What standards are being used and are they current versions are key factors to consider? Are all current partners satisfied with your products’ current metadata feed? As the world and publishing continues to embrace AI or artificial intelligence, the proper use of metadata will only become more important. Get involved and dive in, or engage an outside company to give an assessment of your current metadata status.........
Views: 554 John Bond
What is figshare?
 
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WHAT IS FIGSHARE?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses figshare. MORE VIDEOS on figshare can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3hBx0FMLhydbBKIqYAAFjyB FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to discuss Figshare. Figshare is an online digital repository where researchers can preserve and share their research items. The item formats that can be shared are very varied and include figures, datasets, media including videos, papers including pre-prints, a thesis, posters, presentations, and file sets including groups of files or collections, and more. Figshare allows academics to upload, share, cite, and discover all types of research outputs, with the idea that the material will be preserved long term. It is free to users to upload content and free to access, all in the spirit of open data and open science. Figshare has programs for individuals, publishers, and institutions. Users create an account and upload their research output in a wide variety of formats. All material receives a DOI or digital object identifier and all are distributed under a Creative Commons license. One of the positive sides to using Figshare is that is allows researchers to publish negative data. Many times, it is believed negative publications are withheld or don’t see the light of day because of bias, or the file drawer effect. By posting these items and this data in their component form instead of an article, knowledge can be shared quickly and effortlessly. Figshare was launched in January 2011. It is supported by the company Digital Science, operated by Macmillian Publisher. Figshare is working with some of the largest publishers, including Springer Nature, Taylor & Francis, Wiley, PLOS and many others. Figshare has partnerships or complies with ORCID, NISO, COPE (or the Committee on Publication Ethics), and several other trade groups. As of this date, Figshare has reported the following benchmarks for its efforts: over 26 million page views, more than 7.5 million downloads, 800,000+ uploads, 2 million+ articles, and 500,000 collections and 5,000 projects. Figshare’s motto is “You retain ownership, you license it, you get credit, and they just make sure it persists.” Certainly, a worthy goal in the open access and open knowledge era. Well that’s it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more videos about Figshare. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 202 John Bond
What is an Academic or Scholarly Journal?
 
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What is an Academic or Scholarly Journal?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting looks at what an academic journal is. MORE VIDEOS on what a journal is can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3gTOo9fc3Rl4kbKF32fdGTX FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to go discuss the broadest of topics: what is a peer-reviewed or a scholarly journal. A journal is a scholarly periodical that is different than a magazine. A journal is geared toward academic pursuits and is meant to inform and educate. The publication is usually peer reviewed which means experts in the specific field review the content prior to publication to determine if it is worthy of publication, meaning it adds to the particular field of study. The peer review is usually blind which means the article authors and the reviewers are reviewing the content and are not told who the author or reviewer is. Journals may be subscription based, or they may be sent to all the members of a particular association society as part of their dues or they may be open access, meaning they are free to be read by anyone at any time. A journal may be in paper and in digital form or, increasingly, in just digital form. Journals are likely to be less reliant on advertising income versus magazines, supposedly making them less influenced by advertisers. A journal is composed of articles which are authored by experts and outsiders from the journal, as opposed to staff written articles in magazines. There are many different types of articles some of which include review articles, research articles, articles from supplements, letters, case reports, survey article, position papers, columns or departments, and many more. The journal normally has an Information or Guidelines for Authors which details what type of articles that journal is interested in, what format submissions need to be in, and how to submit an article; among other things. Articles usually include the authors credentials and contact information to establish the authors credibility to discuss the topic. Articles can be lengthy. Journals are very interested in being included in such places as Google Scholar and in abstracting and indexing services as Pub Med and many, many others. Journals also are interested in metrics such as article downloads, citations in other articles, Altmetrics, and others that help determine which articles are having significant impact. Journals can be found in many academic disciplines such as STM, or science/technical/medicine, law, engineering, social sciences, and the humanities, as well as other areas of scholarly communications. Well that’s it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more videos about academic journals and the articles in them. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 341 John Bond
What is ONIX in publishing?
 
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WHAT IS ONIX IN PUBLISHING: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting talks about Online Information Exchange and metadata. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPTS Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going talking about ONIX in publishing. ONIX stands for Online Information Exchange. ONIX refers to an XML standard metadata format in publishing. Originally, it allowed book publishers to create and manage a collection of rich metadata about their products, and to exchange it with their commercial and non-commercial partners such as distributors in a coherent and automated manner. According to EDItEUR, ONIX is "an XML-based family of international standards intended to support computer-to-computer communication between parties involved in creating, distributing, licensing or otherwise making available intellectual property in published form, whether physical or digital." Now called ONIX for Books, it has expanded to include eBooks. ONIX for Books is at release 3.0. ONIX is used worldwide and is the product of a collaboration with many professionals led by EDItEUR (an international group coordinating development of the standards infrastructure), American Association of Publishers, and the Book Industry Study Group in the US and Book Industry Communication in the UK. EDItEUR is now charged with maintaining ONIX. A second flavor of ONIX was developed called ONIX for Serials to capture metadata for serials or subscription products. It is a “family of XML formats for communicating information about serial products and subscription information.” There are several sub formats in this area Finally, is the third standard, ONIX for Publications Licenses. It was created to handle the licenses under which libraries and other institutions use digital resources. There are several companies that provide ONIX software applications including most notably, Firebrand’s Eloquence on Demand and Klopotek, as well as Book Connect, OnixEdit, OnixSuite, Stison Title Manager and Bibliolive. All publishing operations, particularly in book and eBook publishing, need rich, formatted metadata and to provide it in industry standard formats with their partners and ONIX is the answer. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist or more videos about scholarly publishing. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 225 John Bond
What is a Position Paper?
 
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WHAT IS A POSITION PAPER?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting explains Position Papers. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPTS Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going talking about position papers. A position paper is an academic paper or essay that presents an opinion, or position about an issue. It is usually issued by an organization or by an individual author. They are used in academia, politics, law, governmental affairs, and other areas. The position paper presents the facts of an issue and offers a position or arguable opinion about that issue. The goal is to convince the audience that the position is a valid one. Ideas are usually carefully researched, presented, and reasoned in developing the argument. While a position paper may be brief such as a letter to the editor, they are normally longer and detailed in the form of an academic position paper. Classically, they are used by large organizations to make public the official beliefs and recommendations to its members, readers, or the general public. Position papers in academia also encourage dialogue on the topic. They assume a certain level of knowledge among the reader and are not meant to be recitation of the basic facts. Academic societies or membership associations that have an official peer review journal may publish their stance on an issue in the form of a position paper letting their members know where their the group or profession stands on an issue. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more of my videos. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 230 John Bond
What is Open Access
 
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WHAT IS OPEN ACCESS? Or Gold Open Access, Green Open Access, Author Processing Charges? This short video gives a quick overview of these terms as they relate to scholarly publishing. MORE VIDEOS on Open Access: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3ij0nylKwSi30uSLBWebVDa FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to give an overview of Open Access. Open Access is a big topic and it has been a major force in publishing over the last 15 years. Open Access or OA usually refers to journal publishing, but it can also refer to other formats, such as books or monographs. Open Access means that the journal articles or the material are free of all restrictions to access; such as needing a subscription which means that they are available to anyone, anywhere, at any time, assuming you have Internet access. Usually Open Access means the material has limited or no restrictions on its use such a copyright restriction. Finally, the material is usually peer reviewed and online only versus online only and in paper format. Open Access emerged as a force in the early 2000s. It got its start as several factors were coming together. First was the growth of the Internet which allowed OA to be born, and to flourish. Next was the emerging idea that research and its associated writing was many times funded by a government, or another grantor, and therefore there should be no subscription barriers to that material. Also the idea that many of the authors of the material and researchers were university employees or the like and therefore there should be limited barriers to that material. The last factor was that institutional subscription pricing had risen dramatically. For-profit publishers had set the pricing of some journals at a $1,000 all the way up to $10,000 or even more dramatically raising the price, putting it out of the reach of many institutions and many users. So if there is no subscription revenue, how does OA actually work? An Open Access journal may operate under the Gold OA Model. This means the author would be responsible for an APC, or Author Processing Charge. The fee could be anywhere from may be a few hundred dollars all the way to over $3,000 or even more. And it is only paid by authors on an accepted article. The APC that’s incurred is usually reimbursed or paid for through a grant by the individual author or by an institution or paid for by the authors themselves. There are other OA models such as Green OA. This means the author places their article at a repository that’s available to everyone usually run a university or the like. And there is the hybrid OA model, which means that some articles are available through Open Access while others are available through the traditional subscription model. Open Access will continue to flourish. But beware of predatory publishers. More on that later. Well, that’s it. Click on of any of these links to learn more about Open Access or see more information about me. And leave comments below or send me an email. Thanks very much and take care.
Views: 596 John Bond
ResearchGate, Academia.edu, and Social Networking Sites
 
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WHAT ARE ACADEMIC SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses Social Networking Sites. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com MORE VIDEOS on Social Networking Sites can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3j5HcGTFOnqpjjCnTpsRPGp JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to discuss how academic social networking sites like ResearchGate and Academia.edu. A social networking site is an online platform that is used to build social networks or create connections with other people who share similar interests. The look and function of each site will vary but generally they include a personal profile, user generated content, and an ability to connect with others. In research or academia, these are used for professional users to connect with people who share the same professional interests. The most important aspect of social networks for professional purposes are the ability to disseminate information and the ability to reach likeminded contacts. Two popular academic social networking sites are ResearchGate and Acamedia.edu. Research Gate is a social networking site for scientists and researchers to share papers, ask and answer questions, and find collaborators. According to a study by Nature, it is the largest academic social network in terms of active users and research shared with over 13 million active users. People that wish to use the site need to have an email address at a recognized institution or to be confirmed as a published researcher in order to sign up for an account. Members of the site each have a user profile and can upload research output including papers, data, negative results, patents, research proposals, presentations, and software source code. The New York Times described the site as a combination of Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. ResearchGate does not require peer review or fees. Academia.edu is a social networking website for academics. The platform can be used to share papers, monitor a work’s impact, and follow the research in a field. The website allows its users to create a profile, upload their work, select areas of interests and then browse the networks of people with similar interests. Academia.edu has over 50 million registered users, but there is a question about how active many of them are. Academia.edu, FYI is a private company and not a .edu in the traditional sense. Research Gate is also a private company. Of course, there are other social networking sites such as Mendeley and others. Each has a particular twist to their service or area of focus. There are of course criticisms of these services including, most importantly, copyright violations, but also unwanted emails or invitations, fake users, inactive accounts. Any academic or researcher should sign up for these services and have a full, vibrant, and up to date profile. Well that’s it. I’ve released a new eBook called, “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process.” It is a short, focused guide to this essential business task that associations or societies use to find potential publishing partners. See the link in the notes below for more information on the book or how to purchase it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more videos about academic social networking sites. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 1524 John Bond
What are Altmetrics?
 
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WHAT ARE ALTMETRICS? What do they measure? How do they compare to traditional article level metrics? Do they measure an article or journals' scholarly impact? This short video gives a quick overview of these terms as they relate to scholarly publishing. MORE VIDEOS on Altmetrics: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3gPQSPocw-OOczGKEwqbRg2 FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there, I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to give an overview of Altmetrics. Altmetrics is a non-traditional method of assessing an article in a scholarly publication for its impact. Traditionally, a journal was measured by such items as its Impact Factor, peer review, citation counts. In 2010 a movement started to look at alternative metrics, altmetrics, to augment the existing measures for an article. Altmetrics are non-traditional, article-level metrics that can include journal comments, blog mentions, Wikipedia mentions, Tweets, Facebook posts, or other events. The items can be very broad from saved, to cited, to recommended, to mentions, and more. Altmetrics can measure articles, but also videos, individuals, journals, and a host of other items. Since 2010, altmetrics have grown and are now embraced by most major publishers and all journals. With over 8,000 journals using altmetrics, they are quickly becoming an expected metric for a publication. They supplement Impact Factor, pageviews, peer review, and the like in determining how articles are measured. A publisher may provide these metrics themselves or more likely they more work with a third party such as Altmetric.com (no S), Plum Analytics, Impactstory, Kudos, or others who have been serving this space for some time. These services cover articles, but also authors, journals, publishers, and institutions, in one form or another. Check these companies out for more details about their services. A publisher may display a graphic, badge, icon or donut that leads a reader to a display showing the various categories of events such as Tweets or the like with the relevant number that occurred. The publisher may also present a list of the Top 10 or 100 articles using the various metrics or categories. The use of these type lists, or altmetrics itself, is helping to engage readers and drive article downloads. While altmetrics are widely used, several concerns or questions remain in scholarly publishing. The gaming of altmetrics is the first concern. With little effort, an article or paper can show a big gain that may not correlate to its value in the field. Some of the events measured, such as Likes or Tweets, can be purchased or programed, exacerbating the issue. Also, how do you weight events such as Tweets, and Facebook posts, or Wikipedia mentions against each other? Is one worth more than another? Who assigns the value? Finally, does altmetrics help define the impact of the research? Does an article with high altmetrics mean greater value to the profession or perhaps does it just mean it is trendy topic or controversial? Altmetrics will continue to grow and become a given for any publisher or researcher. Further research as to altmetrics effectiveness are necessary, along with some standardization of terms and value. The term altmetrics is likely to change, perhaps to social media metrics or the like. Altmetrics will also need to continue to integrate with other parts of scholarly publishing such as PubMed, CrossRef or Orcid ID. More on this last one later. That’s it. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or see the link below for my playlist of more videos on altmetrics. And make comments below or send me an email. Take care and thank you very much.
Views: 647 John Bond
What is OER or Open Educational Resources?
 
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WHAT IS OER OR OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses OER. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com MORE VIDEOS on OER can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3hSEx54LWNUieMb0gnULDFv JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about OER or Open Educational Resources. OER is an umbrella term for freely accessible, openly licensed text, media, and other digital assets that are useful for teaching, learning, and assessing as well as for research purposes. The movement is an outgrowth of the open access, open science, and open education movements. The term OER got started in the late 90’s or early 00’s and is usually credited to David Wiley, MIT the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, who all played separate roles in launching the valued movement. OER material is usually digital, and carries a broad level of openness with ready access with no restrictions on reuse, usually using a Creative Commons license. In fact, many times the material can be personalized to an institution or school. The material comes in the form of student textbooks or workbooks, faculty resources, supplemental content, videos, worksheets, software, and other materials. The digital and open nature of the material means easier revising when errors are found or the content becomes outdated content, with reduced time for these revisions. The obvious benefit is very low or no costs to the student or the school/institution. The initial focus of the OER movement was on K to 12 education, but it quickly expanded to higher education including highly academic fields. Higher education is a natural place for OER to blossom and succeed as course materials continue to rise in price. OER faces a few challenges. First there is no universal open file format for OER materials. Second, the perception still exists that free means lower quality or unreliable quality. Expanding acceptance of open access journal articles may be helping to change that. Also, efforts such as Center for Open Education at the University of Minnesota to have faculty around the country review and rate the material will help ensure quality and reliability with this content. There is a lot going on in this area. An organization such as OER Commons (at oercommons.org) is leading the way. They “offer a comprehensive infrastructure for curriculum experts and instructors at all levels to identify high-quality OER and collaborate around their adaptation, evaluation, and use to address the needs of teachers and learners.” Major institutions such as MIT, Google, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, many of the other major foundations, and many state and national governments are investing heavily in developing and promoting OER. I look forward to reporting back on OER’s headway into higher education, particularly STEM education, very, very soon. Well that’s it. I’ve released a new eBook called, “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process.” It is a short, focused guide to this essential business task that associations or societies use to find potential publishing partners. See the link in the notes below for more information on the book or how to purchase it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more videos OER. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 1192 John Bond
Using Plagiarism Software in the Publishing Process
 
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USING PLAGIARISM SOFTWARE IN THE PUBLISHING PROCESS: This short video gives a quick overview of the use of plagiarism checking software in scholarly publishing. MORE VIDEOS on Using Plagiarism Software in the Publishing Process: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3hRcTOTzxAslo85ZbsF8Khp FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: He there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to discuss the potential use of plagiarism checking software in publishing. I am going to be addressing its use by publishers, associations, or organizations as opposed to its use by individuals. Publishers and associations have a vested interest in ensuring that the journal articles, book chapters, and other scholarly material they publish is original and free of plagiarism. While one would hope that this should not be an issue, experience says otherwise. There is little question if an organization should be incorporating this step into the publishing process. It is only the details and the particular software that matters. A point to start with is that with many groups use the term similarity instead of plagiarism, the later coming with a judgement in place. Similarity check or a similarity review may be more appropriate terminology than plagiarism check or review. If you are an association whose journal is being published with a publisher, first check with them that this step is not already taking place on their end, perhaps unbeknownst to you. Larger publishers have embraced this step and may routinely be running manuscripts through their chosen software. Also, it may be incorporated into the manuscript tracking system or it may be soon. Another point to consider is whether all manuscripts will be reviewed prior to or at peer review or whether the step will take place only after manuscript acceptance. There are valid points for either option. Most systems produce a report that lists the percentage of a document that matches other content and where that content comes from. Think through which staff member will run the manuscript through the system you use. For those manuscripts that have a high similarity, who will then make the more nuanced and educated decision if there is a cause for concern. Many times it is subjective. Then consider the stance you might take with an author and what that correspondence would look like. It can be a very touchy email or call, that will likely vary greatly by the particular circumstance. As for software, there are many types out there. Some are free and low cost and many are geared toward the individual. Before you invest your time with any software, ask the developers or owners how many publishers or associations are currently using their product. If they cannot provide that information or references, you should shy away from them. Remember, free is not always better. For those that provide a product to the publishing market, it is a very small list. iThenticate has a significant presence. iThenticate states that it has checked over 50 million documents for plagiarism. They also say that “80% of high Impact Factor Journals have access to iThenticate.” See their website for more information about how their service works include helpful videos. CrossRef, the not-for-profit, well-respected reference linking group, created a product called CrossCheck. CrossCheck has since been rebranded as Similarity Check. Similarity Check might be considered a separate option to iThenticate, however, Similarity Check is “powered by iThenticate.” Similarity Check states that “members benefit from a tailored service that includes read-only access to the full text of articles in the Similarity Check database for comparison purposes” only. FYI the Similarity Check service is only available to members of CrossRef who are depositing DOIs with them. There is other software to consider. One site lists other commercial options as: Attributor, Copyscape, Copyleaks, PlagScan, and I am sure others that I missed that work with publishers and the like. Let me know about who you have worked with, how you like them, and anything else that is connected......
Views: 849 John Bond
Blockchain and Publishing
 
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WHAT IS BLOCKCHAIN: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses Blockchain and Publishing. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPTS Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about blockchain and publishing. Without a doubt, blockchain is the trending term on the internet, in technology, in finance, and more recently, in publishing. It is also a little understood or misunderstood term, despite it being discussed so much. At its most essence, blockchain is a foundational technology that can, and will, lead to new and transformational business and/or operating models. Here is blockchain at its most basic level: it is a continuously growing list of records, called blocks, which are securely linked to each other, by a chain or connection. By design, a blockchain is resistant to modification of the data. It is "an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way". A blockchain is typically managed by a peer-to-peer network that adheres to a set of rules for validating new entries or information. Think of it as an open, decentralized system to exchange information, or files, or funds. This new system will also increase efficiencies and reduce costs. Decentralized is an important element of blockchain. This makes blockchains potentially suitable for the recording of events, medical records, and other records management activities, such as identity management, transaction processing, and much more. To date, blockchain has been associated with cryptocurrencies, one of which is Bitcoin. While this is true, this does blockchain an injustice as it does, and will do, so much more. Imagine if someone said the web IS Wikipedia. You would correct them and say, while the web helps create and present Wikipedia, the web is many, may other things. True for blockchain as well. While blockchain may have its roots in in the financial market, it has become so much more. A World Economic Forum report predicted that by 2025 ten percent of global GDP might be stored on blockchain technology. Blockchain can and will be changing research and publishing. The Alliance of Independent Authors is a non-profit professional association for authors They have posited that blockchain could be used for source authentication of copyrights helping to address the piracy issue; smart payments or smart wallets to facilitate microtransactions; automating and monitoring contracts between groups using smart contracts such as royalty or rights arrangements; and perhaps assist with the thorny issue of privacy and the ownership of data. There will be further developments such as uses in peer review, providing new publishing metrics, addressing reproducibility, and much more. A lot is going in business and publishing with blockchain right now and likely this video will need frequent updating. Stay tuned. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist or more videos about academic publishing. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 146 John Bond
Starting a YouTube Channel - 9 Easy Steps
 
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STARTING A YOUTUBE CHANNEL: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses Starting a YouTube Channel. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com MORE VIDEOS on Starting a YouTube Channel can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3jXN_L_EZK-Rcv8s3UanWPw JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps/ Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps/ SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about starting a video channel on YouTube. Video has seen explosive growth. Publishers, academics, educators, consultants, and others are embracing this easy and inexpensive way to create quality content. Here are the nine simple steps to getting started. First, come up with the focus for your channel; what is the point to the content you will be creating. Develop a niche and see what other content is out there that serves this area. The more focused the better. Second, choose a platform. I chose YouTube over other channels like Vimeo because of YouTube’s connection with Google Search as well as the broad audience the channel offers. For YouTube, you will need to register will Google and create an account. Sign into Creator Studio and name your video channel. Think carefully about the name you choose. By the way, the dashboard at YouTube is very valuable and shows views, subscribers, and a host of other statistics. Third, add graphics to the channel as well as information about you, links to your website, social media, etc. Fourth, you are ready to record. Write a script. Read it aloud several times. Have a tight focus for the content. I aim to have a video be three to five minutes in length. Keep the videos in your area of focus. Do not pinball all over the place with the topics that you choose. Fifth, you are ready to record. I use my existing iPhone 6 on a $10 tripod. You can: speak from memory, make it up as you go along, or use teleprompter software. I use the teleprompter software from JoeAllen Pro. $12. It is easy to use. I upload the script to the phone and I am ready to go. Be mindful of the background, outside noises, and the lighting. Test, test, test until you get it right. I record in short segments and then link them together later. When you are done, send the files to your computer. Sixth, edit the files. There are a few free video editing programs out there that work. There are some that come with a cost. All I do in the editor is trim the beginning and end of each clip, splice them together, and add an introductory slide at the start. Seventh, the file is ready. I upload it to YouTube, add a thumbnail, and add my script in for closed captioning. Most important is to be very diligent with tags about the video and a full description under the Notes section including a transcript. Eighth, publish the video. Ninth, promote the video on social media, at your website, to your contacts, everywhere. Make sure you ask everyone to subscribe to your channel. Engage with your subscribers and other viewers. All of the small steps mentioned so far (like creating a thumbnail) are very, very simple. All have videos at YouTube on how to do them and they are incredible easy to follow. None of these steps should scare you as being technical. Believe me, they are not. Each video for me takes less two hours to create from script writing to posting. Total cost so far to create all the videos has been less than $25. Scholars and academics can promote their work or do video abstracts. Publishers can create videos from news articles or promote upcoming events. Associations and societies can promote their meetings, engage members, or give updates on new initiatives. All of this is incredibly easy. Have fun with it and experiment. My enjoyment comes from the small changes in each video to the bookshelves behind me. Easter eggs for my own amusement....
Views: 151 John Bond
What is Publons?
 
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What is Publons? This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses the service Publons. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk Publons. Publons is a service used by academics that allows them to track, verify, and showcase their peer review for scholarly journals. Publons' mission is to "speed up science by harnessing the power of peer review". Publons provides a verified record of an academic’s review and editorial activity for journals. In addition, it provides: tools for publishers to find, screen and contact potential peer reviewers; data about peer review; training for researchers new to review; and a venue for academics to discuss published research. Reviewers can choose whether or not to make their review open access after publication if the journal is in agreement. Publons was launched in 2012 by Andrew Preston and Daniel Johnston to address the moribund state of peer-reviewing practices in publishing, by encouraging speeding scientific development. Publons was acquired by Clarivate Analytics in 2017. That year, Publons won the ALPSP Innovation in Publishing Award. As of 2018, Publons states it has over 400,000 researchers, 2 million reviews, for over 25,000 Journals. Publons also offers Publons Academy, which is a review training course for newbie researchers. The course is free, as is the Publons service to academics. Publishers are charged a fee to use their services. Publons claims by using its service, academics can help advance in individual evaluations, such as performance reviews or with promotions and salary. It can also assist with funding, grant applications, and even green card applications. To many, Publons has been a welcome addition to peer review, which many feel needs to move forward into the 21st century. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me at RiverwindsConsulting.com with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click here to see my video about peer review. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 196 John Bond
What is Peer Review?
 
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WHAT IS PEER REVIEW? How do an author and a journal interact? How is a decision is made on individual articles submitted for consideration? This short video gives a quick overview of these topics as they relate to scholarly publishing. MORE VIDEOS on Peer Review: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3iYB7cqK8OSGmVKzZJwRBS8 FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there. This is John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to be giving an overview of peer review. Peer review, as I’ll be discussing today, relates to the scholarly review of an article for publication. I am mostly going to discuss it as relates to journals, but it also relates to books as well. Peer review is the quality control measure a publisher or journal might take to determine what to publish. It is an essential step in furthering the research and the advancement in a particular field. Those publications that are not peer reviewed are held in lower esteem than those that are. So how does peer review work? Typically, an author will choose a journal in their field they would like to consider. They will go to journal’s website and upload their manuscript, figures, tables; into an electronic review system. From here, the journal staff or the editor will take over. They may do a pre-check of the material to see that it fits within the journal’s stated guidelines of the number of words, or the number of images, or the format that the manuscript is in. They may even dive into the content to see if it fits within the mission of the journal. Remember to follow a journal’s stated guidelines closely; to save everyone time. If it doesn’t follow those guidelines or meet the requirements, then you may receive the article back with a letter stating why. Let’s say it does follow the guidelines. The editor or the staff will assign it to peer reviewers. These reviewers may come from the editorial board, editorial review panel, or other experts that are familiar with that area. From that point, the reviewers will read the article very closely, and fill out a form that is personalized to that individual journal. They will make a recommendation of accept, accept with changes, revise, reject and they will pass that material back along to the staff or the editor. Classically, there are three reviewers but there may be more or less depending on the individual journal. Once the editor receives the material back, the editor will look and review the decisions. If there three accepts or three accepts, the path is pretty clear. More likely the verdict is mixed. In which case, the editor would read the material and look at the reviews and make a decision. If the decisions are far apart, then the editor may ask the reviewers some probing questions or go to an additional reviewer. When a decision is finally made, the journal will go to the author and tell the author their decision. If the article is accepted, of course it will be edited, posted online and published. Or the decision may be revise, in which case the publisher will give the author specific or broad suggestions of what is to be changed. The author can consider these, potentially make the changes, and resubmit the manuscript and the process starts all over again. Or the decision might be reject, in which case the publisher might give comments back as to why the manuscript is being rejected. Either way the process is likely to be blind or anonymous to the individual author. Peer review ensures quality. Publishing in a journal that embraces peer review means your work is more likely to be disseminated, downloaded, and have a greater number of citations. More on that later. Well that’s it. Thank you very much for watching. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click here to see more videos on peer review. Thank you very much and take care.
Views: 623 John Bond
Editorial Boards on Peer Review Journals
 
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EDITORIAL BOARDS ON PEER REVIEW JOURNALS. This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses being a member on an Editorial Board. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about being an editorial board member on a peer review journal. The editorial board of a journal provides direction, gives insight into new developments in the field, is an advocate for the journal to the community, and, probably most notably, provides peer review for submitted manuscripts. Editorial boards can vary from perhaps a dozen professionals to more than a hundred. They usually cover all areas of interest within the specialty of the publication. Increasingly they come from the global community, unless the publication is geographically limited. The board is headed up by an editor, or editor in chief, or one of many other titles. Sometimes there might be senior editors or associate editors that help direct the publication and perform the many duties necessary to run the journal. The editor and editorial board serve at the behest of the publisher or association that runs or owns the journal. In most instances, the board serves in an advisory capacity and is not a voting board. As I mentioned, the primary duty of editorial board members is to peer review manuscripts. Thankfully this is done via sophisticated online manuscript tracking software. The reviewer can leave detailed comments about the paper and then suggest if the manuscript be accepted, rejected, or sent back for revision. Most reviewers are not asked to edit or rewrite manuscripts, but more to focus on content. A reviewer might be asked to review a few manuscripts a year, or sometimes many more than that. Timeliness of review is important to all publications. Being on an editorial board is an unpaid position. The position of editor and perhaps some other senior positions usually come with an honorarium. Most members are asked to join the board as their career reaches prominence. Some are recommended by others on the board. The requirements usually for board membership are: having significant advancement in the field, a track record in writing and perhaps editing, previous reviewing experience perhaps on other journals or committees, and, if an association publication, being a member of the association. Some journals entertain self-nomination to a board. Sometimes board members will serve a specific term of a few years. Other times, it is at the discretion of the editor. Change on an editorial board is a good thing. It allows new ideas and new perspectives to keep the journal fresh. Editorial board members are the backbone of the scholarly journal system. They ensure the quality of the content and the integrity of the peer review system. There has been much discussion about this uncompensated work. Stay tuned to see if the industry moves towards a new model for compensation, versus simply career recognition. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me at RiverwindsConsulting.com. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist or more videos about scholarly publishing. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 170 John Bond
How to Submit an Article
 
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How to Submit an Article. This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses the procedure for submitting a paper to a peer review journal. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk how to submit an article to a scholarly journal for possible publication. So, you have done the research. You have compiled your data and drawn your conclusions. Your manuscript or paper is written. You have had colleagues and friends give you feedback and you have made appropriate changes. You have had it proofread by a friend. Now it is game time. You want to submit the manuscript for publication in a peer review journal. But how do you proceed? First, draft a list of possible journals for consideration. Hopefully, you know and read these journals religiously. This will help to decide which journal to try first, based on its niche. Next, go to your top targeted journal and read their Guidelines for Authors or Information for Authors. Study it and ensure you are in 100% compliance, such as with their requested page count, reference style, types of manuscripts they seek. Third, consider whether you should query the editor of the journal about their interest in the submission. Some journals encourage this, some allow it, and some don’t address queries without the manuscript. Now you are ready. Most journals will use a manuscript submission tracking system. Popular ones are Editorial Manager by Aries Systems, ScholarOne by Clarivate Analytics, and others. When you find get to journal’s page for submission, your first step will likely be registration. You will create an account that you will potentially use to check back in on its progress. Next you will need to enter into the system information about your manuscript. This will include title, authors including contact information and degrees, keywords, and more. Likely, you and the co-authors will need to sign a conflict of interest statement as well as potential financial disclosures. Next you will upload the manuscript. The text part of the manuscript will be separate, as might the abstract. After that, you will upload the various components such as tables, figures, videos, or more. Most journals have exacting requirements as to the format and size of the files. The journal might then display a PDF or complied version of the paper for you to approve. The final step is, although for some journals it might be earlier in the process, is signing a copyright statement or form. All authors of the paper will need to read and sign it, likely electronically. You may need to acknowledge any fees such as an APC or author processing charge for an open access journal, but they are usually not due at this stage. You may also be asked for colleagues in your area of specialty to submit your article to for peer review, but they are likely to have their own list as well. From there, the journal and peer review process take over. Each journal has a slightly different procedure, but they all roughly follow these steps. Good luck with publication. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me at RiverwindsConsulting.com with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click here to see my video on choosing the best journal for your paper. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 259 John Bond
RFPs Part 5: Reviewing Proposals & Scoring Responses
 
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“Request for Proposals in Publishing” is a video series by Riverwinds Consulting. This video is Part 5: “Reviewing Proposals and Scoring Responses.” This series covers the basics for any organization or group wishing to issue an RFP for a publishing project such as a journal to find potential publishing partners. This video series is by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting and gives the broad steps in the process. The complete series can be found at this Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3hTYEXbal0Y66UkLeG7EJmY FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consultancy at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. This is the fifth in a seven-part video series on issuing an RFP or Request for Proposal to potential partners to publish a journal. This part is called Reviewing Proposals and Scoring Responses. All proposals are in and it is time to examine them and make a decision. Establish who will be reviewing the proposals in the organization and provide them with deadlines for their review. Going back to an earlier discussion, the establishment of a selection criteria is essential. A scoring grid should be provided that allows the reviewers to assign a value to each item. The items may also be weighted. Likely, all items such as experience in the field, advertising sales reach, or royalty percentage cannot all have the same weight. This scoring grid and weighting system should be established as early on in the process as possible. All parties internally need to buy into the selection criteria. Create a chart of responses by the reviewers for all of the publishers’ proposals to bring clarity to the varying documents. Footnotes may help explain variances in individual responses or unique offerings. Helping to bring clarity to the review of the proposals is one of the most important benefits a publishing consultant can bring to the process. Also, the consultant will help read between the lines of the responses and get to the heart of an issue that may be buried in publishing jargon. Three steps might take place at this juncture. First there may be a round of clarifying questions that go back to an individual publisher or all of the publishers. Second, at this early stage some groups may want to check the provided references of all the publishers. Diving into other associations’ experience with the particular publisher may prove helpful. Third, there may be in-person presentations for some or all of the groups. If there are to be presentations, ensure that all of the decision team members from the association are present. The association and publishers should agree on the length of the presentations and format. If there are questions to be addressed by the publishers, they should be provided to all parties ahead of time. Finer points to understand at this juncture are what work will be done by the publisher themselves and what work will be outsourced by them. Be clear on this point, with the prevalence of outsourcing of work, particularly editorial work. Know who, will do what, for the publisher and where are they located. Also, will the people providing the proposal be the people working on the publication? If not, who will be the contacts? How long have they worked at that company? How long have they been in the industry? How well do they know the publishing market or the field of study for the journal? A key item to discuss is how revenue projections were derived. Getting to the heart of these projections, particularly if the connect back to a royalty being paid, is essential. Knowing if the projections were created with rose colored glasses or as a “no-less than” mindset is very important. So, the proposals have all been examined and scored and the team that is doing the evaluation have meet to compare scores and impressions. The decision that starts to emerge of the finalist or finalists may be clear but it is still subjective. There may be a clear-cut leader, but perhaps not because of the intangibles.....
Views: 577 John Bond
Choosing a Journal or Book Printer
 
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CHOOSING A JOURNAL OR BOOK PRINTER: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses choosing a printer. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com MORE VIDEOS on Choosing a Printer can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3hhpEzslKtzBHbxgWCmDvL4 JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps/ Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps/ SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about choosing a book or journal printer. While the world assuredly is going digital, print has remained part of the necessary offerings for many publishing companies. Choosing the right partner can save money, ensure proper time to market, and guarantee quality. Here are six tips for choosing a book or journal printer. First, when you consider potential partners, look national versus those just in your backyard. Be open minded to any national firm whether you can visit them on a regular basis or not. Other than an initial visit, there should be almost no reason to visit your printer a lot. Press approvals are a thing of the past in almost all circumstances. Also, look for printers that do a lot of the business in the run size that you are working in. Don’t choose a short run printer to do a long run publication, and vice versa. Second, only consider printers were the focus of their business is on books or journals. Commercial printers might be able to do the work, but a specialist is needed in this competitive market. They need to come to you with ways to save money or change processes during your relationship and working with a recognized firm should ensure this. Third, when you go out for bid, be open to small changes in specs that might lower prices due to a company’s particular equipment. Let bidders know that changes to trim size, color usage, binding, and other factors would be considered, in addition to your original specs. Fourth, look closely at paper costs and talk to the printers on how to ensure the best possible price without sacrificing quality or your vision of the publication. Spend as much time talking about paper, including house stocks, as you do talking about press costs. Fifth, for journals, dive deeply into postage costs. Depending on the run length, talk about co-mailing and potential cost savings. For finalists in your bidding process, you may want to consider taking your mailing list and having an analysis done on projected postal costs. Where the printer is located regionally will definitely affect costs, plus or minus. Also look at the shipping costs for bulk mailing to a convention or to your offices. Spend almost as much time understanding postal costs as you do looking at printing and paper costs. For books, consider the final book weight to determine how it will affect shipping costs to customers. Sixth, create a great request for proposal and ensure all aspects of the printing operations are covered. Send the RFP to qualified potential partners, hopefully at least five. With the resulting proposals from the printers, block out time to analyze them side by side very closely. Don’t just look at the bottom number. Call the bidders up and ask them a ton of questions. At the end of the day, choose a partner and not just low bidder. On time delivery and quality work count are obviously crucial. Well that’s it. I’ve released a new eBook called, “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process.” It is a short, focused guide to this essential business task that associations or societies use to find potential publishing partners. See the link in the notes below for more information on the book or how to purchase it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more videos about choosing a printer. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 321 John Bond
Text Mining in Publishing
 
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TEXT MINING AND SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses Text Mining and the Scholarly Publishing Industry. MORE VIDEOS on TEXT MINING and Scholarly Publishing can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3jY125di1g8UDADCMvCY1zk FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to discuss text mining as it relates to scholarly publishing. Text mining also goes by the phrase text data mining or text analytics. Text mining in scholarly publishing is the process of deriving high-quality information from peer reviewed articles and other content. It does this by processing large amounts of information and looking for patterns within the data, and then evaluating and interpreting the results. Text mining is most beneficial to researchers or other power users of technical content. It is very different from a keyword search such that you might perform with Google. A key word search likely produces thousands of web links with no uniformity in the results and certainly no ability to draw meaningful conclusions. An example: let’s say you are researching bladder cancer in men and you are looking for specific biomarkers for other disease states. You probably don’t have the time to review all the literature you might find through a search at PubMed. Text mining will review the available literature. It understands the parts of speech (nouns, verbs), recognizes abbreviations, takes term frequency into account, and other natural language processes. It will filter through all the content, extracts relevant facts, spot patterns, and provides the researcher with a more condensed set of results and statements than a literature search or a cursory review of abstracts ever could. It knows bladder cancer is a disease state. It knows, in this instance, to look for men as opposed to women. It understands what a biomarker is and how to apply this term to other disease states. It understands bladder cancer is a phrase and not being used as two separate terms. Text mining software involves high level programming and such concepts as word frequency distribution, pattern recognition, information extraction, and natural language processing as well as other programming concepts well beyond the scope of this video. The overall goal is to turn text into data for analysis and thereby help to draw conclusions. However, the results of text mining in and of themselves is not the end product, just part of the process. Individual text mining tools or enterprise level ones have become more common with researchers, librarians, and large for profit and not for profit organizations, and they will only grow. Aside from a text mining tool, an application is also necessary to check that the content being mined is licensed and to provide appropriate links to the content. Text mining is important to publishers or any group that holds large stores of full text articles or databases because this information as a whole has greater value than each individual part. Text mining can help extract that value. A key point for publishers is that the text mining tool and its user, such as a researcher, needs to have access to the content either by it being open access, through a subscription, or through a purchase. Subscription publishers see revenue when content is accessed or purchased. All publishers see article downloads and page views from text mining efforts. Either way, text mining as a tool in research, in medicine, in pharmaceutical R&D will only continue to grow in importance. Well that’s it. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more videos about text mining in scholarly publishing. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 275 John Bond
2019 Trends in Scholarly Publishing
 
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2019 TRENDS IN SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING. This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses what is happening in Academic Publishing in 2019 in including Sci-Hub, AI, VR, open source publishing tools and more. JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “You Can Write and Publish a Book, Second Edition” Buy it at Amazon: https://amzn.to/2PcrFfL To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/ FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPTION Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about the trends in scholarly publishing for 2019. The academic publishing world continues to be affected by change at an amazing pace. Whether this is positive, or negative is in the eye of the beholder. Here is a list of the key topics presenting opportunities and threats to the world of publishing. First, will be business and economic issues. A concern continues if there will be a substantial slow down in the economy in 2019, thus affecting business or sales overall. Additionally, acquisitions and consolidation will likely be on many people’s plates. Finally, I believe the overall business model in scholarly publishing will continue to adapt as open access alters the established economic model. Second, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusivity (rightly so) was a major topic of conversation this past year and I predict it will only heat up in 2019. Third, as the election approaches in the US, I believe social media will continue to take it on the chin. Those content creators that rely on social media as a major traffic source may need to readjust their model. Fourth, somewhat connected, users will increasingly balance their demand for privacy with their interest in usage and functionality. Readers may be willing to live with less functionality to be more anonymous. Fifth, open source publishing tools and software will expand as content providers turn to them for alternatives. Sixth, AI or artificial intelligence will continue to move from concept to application in many areas such as messaging, predictive analytics, and others. AI is not coming; it is here. Seventh, multimedia will continue to supplant text. Video, audio, animation, VR all will be gobbled up by “readers” in a skyrocketing amount. Eighth, podcasting, experimented with in the past in scholarly publishing, will take a greater foothold, as it has in a major way in mainstream culture. Ninth, last but not least, is Sci-Hub. This website/effort/crusade will continue to (appropriately) worry scholarly publishing. Like it or not, for profit and not for profit publishing will have to come to terms with it; one way or another Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the link to see my video on trends for 2018. Email me and let me know your thoughts on how you think I did last year. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 107 John Bond
What is a Megajournal?
 
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WHAT IS A MEGAJOURNAL?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting talks about Megajournals in publishing. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPTS Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about megajournals. A megajournal is a peer-reviewed scholarly open access journal. It is usually more expansive in scope than a traditional journal. The characteristics of megajournals are usually considered to be: online only, open access (and therefore funded via an APC or Article Processing Charge), broad in scope, willing to consider most articles on their technical merit, and usually a rapid turnaround time to publication. The first megajournal in many people’s minds was PLOS ONE, or the Public Library of Science. Other certainly preceded PLOS ONE, such as The Scientific World Journal and some Biomed Central publications. Many other megajournals have followed such as Scientific Reports, Nature Communications, BMJ Open, and many others. The topic of a megajournal can be as broad as science, or medicine, or the like and is very rarely as focused as subscription journals are. PLOS ONE has recently been overtaken by Scientific Reports as the largest megajournal. Mega, is applied more to the size of the journal’s subject than the volume of paper’s published, which vary widely from PLOS’s huge output to much more modest ones from second tier journals like Heliyon or others. The phrase megajournal for some has been, incorrectly, associated with predatory publishing. The megajournal format has been the focus of other criticisms as well. At the end of the day, the question many have had in scholarly publishing is what some megajournals have added to the intellectual discussions in their chosen field? Have they added more to the conversation or are they simply a venue for an author to publish, and a source of revenue for the publishers? Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more of my videos. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 107 John Bond
What is Open Peer Review?
 
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WHAT IS OPEN PEER REVIEW: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting talks about the different types of Open Peer Review. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about open peer review. To start off, peer review is the process of subjecting an author's scholarly work or research to the scrutiny of experts in the same field, before a paper describing this work is published in a journal. Peer review is the bed rock of scholarly or academic work and a well-established quality control. Peer review requires a community of experts and has traditionally been anonymous. Journal peer review has used single blind or double-blind peer review. See a link at the end of this video for more information on the differences between these. A recent development in this area has been open peer review. There are three different types of open peer review. First is open-identity or attributed peer review which means the reviewer’s names are made public. Traditionally, blinded peer review has been the norm. With open-identity the reviewer’s names are part of then part of the record of publication and can be considered when evaluating the work. The next type is open-disclosure peer review. This means that the substance of the reviews, that is the reviews and comments themselves, are publicly available. It has also been called public peer review or transparent peer review. The final flavor is open-invitation peer review which means that anyone can contribute to the peer review process. This becomes a continuous process, even after publication. This has this most impact in a rapidly evolving area. Open peer review dates back to the 1990s and has had many journals experiment with it in one form or another. Sometimes they have gone back to the traditional system and other times have kept open peer review in place. The results continue to be mixed. Do reviewers give honest feedback when the system is open? Do the best or most important reviewers shy away from this option, to the detriment of the content? Does it add to time to publication by delaying the review process as reviewers are secured? Are the benefits to the readers and authors meaningful, modest, or negligible? There have been some interesting studies with self-reported survey findings and more research would be helpful. Peer review, deservedly so, will continue to evolve. As scholarly content and ideas seek the quickest way to market and as readers seek an assurance of lack of bias and that the best idea come to the fore, peer review will need to adjust to fit the market. Well that’s it. I’ve released a new eBook called, “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer.” It is a short, focused guide on some of the essential topics that are integral to academic publishing. Starting with the basics of scholarly publishing, it then moves onto the specifics of book and journal publishing, then marketing and promotion, then to organizations and standards, then to rights and licensing, and finally it looks at trends in publishing. It was born out of videos on this channel. See the link in the notes below for more information on the book or how to purchase it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the link to my video on single and double blind peer review. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 177 John Bond
How-To-Books: On Writing Family Stories & On Getting Published
 
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Are you interested in writing family stories? Or perhaps you would like to publish a book? Author John Bond discusses his two books and how they encourage readers and writers to get started on their story today. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi there, I’m John Bond. I’d like to tell you briefly about the two books that I have written. The first one is “The Story of You: A Guide for Writing Your Personal Stories and Family History.” This book is a practical guide for the novice writer about how to chronicle the stories of his or her life. The book encourages the reader to write the classic stories that everyone has, whether just for themselves, or for their family and friends or the future. The book includes chapters on how to get started, how to distribute or publish these stories, and, best of all, “219 Questions to Prime the Pump” which helps get people thinking about what they can write about. I was inspired to write the book when, years ago, I was speaking to my parents about their experience growing up in Brooklyn and Queens during the Depression. Their everyday experiences such as buying from food peddlers in the street were foreign to me and I realized that they would be even more so for my children. The book is a fun and simple way to get started on telling stories people will value for many, many years to come. My other book is “You Can Write and Publish a Book: Essential Information on How to Get Your Book Published.” This book gives detailed information about: creating a proposal, finding an agent, finding a publisher, writing the manuscript, and marketing the book. It is guaranteed to motivate the reader to get started on the road to publishing today. I was inspired with this one when I heard a statistic that over 75% of the people in the United States feel they have a book in them. It’s a nearly universal aspiration. The book includes a fun Self-Assessment Quiz that contains 89 questions which allows the reader to gauge their chances of becoming a published author. For more information on either book, look in the description below to go to my website BooksByJohnBond.com or you can go to my author page at Amazon. I have also included a link to my website for my day job which is a consultant in publishing. Finally, click her to Subscribe to my YouTube channel which is about scholarly publishing. And of course send me an email with any questions you have or leave a comment below. Thank you so much and take care.
Views: 174 John Bond
What is Creative Commons?
 
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WHAT IS CREATIVE COMMONS?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses Creative Commons. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com MORE VIDEOS on Creative Commons can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3g1p4hEd_jqUF9QiOoXVJUq WIKIPEDIA on Creative Commons criticism: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creative_Commons JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to look at Creative Commons. Creative Commons is a non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative works available for others to build upon legally and to share. The organization has released several copyright-licenses known as Creative Commons licenses, free of charge to the public. These licenses allow individuals to indicate which rights they reserve, and which rights they waive for the benefit of other individuals. Creative Commons licenses do not replace copyright, but are based upon it. They bridge individual communication between the creator and a potential user or licensee. The result is an easy system that assists all parties involved. There are several licenses and they center around different conditions as chosen by the content creator: First, attribution or the acronym BY. This means the licensees may copy, distribute, and display the work and make derivative works based on it, only if they give the author the attribution specified. Second, Share-alike or SA. Licensees may distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs the original work. Third, Non-commercial or NC. Licensees may copy, distribute, and display the work and make derivative works based on it only for non-commercial purposes. Finally, Non-derivative or ND. Licensees may copy, distribute, and display only exact copies of the work, not derivative works based on it. Common licenses someone might use are: CC BY, CC NC, CC ND, CC SA, CC NC SA, or CC NC ND. There are other licenses as well. Creative Commons was founded in 2001 by Lawrence Lessig, Hal Abelson, and Eric Eldred with the support of Center for the Public Domain. The first set of copyright licenses was released the following year. As of 2016, there were over 1.1 billion works licensed under the various Creative Commons licenses. Some of the major organizations using Creative Commons licenses are: YouTube, Wikipedia, Flickr, the Internet Archive, Vimeo, Wikimedia Commons, PLOS, and many, many others. While there are criticisms of these licenses and the organization (see their Wikipedia page for a discussion about them), no one can deny the tremendous positive affect that Creative Commons has had on the creation and sharing of quality content and the democratization of knowledge. Well that’s it. I’ve released a new eBook called, “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process.” It is a short, focused guide to this essential business task that associations or societies use to find potential publishing partners. See the link in the notes below for more information on the book or how to purchase it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more videos about Creative Commons. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 410 John Bond
What is a Ringgold Identifier in Publishing?
 
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WHAT IS A RINGGOLD IDENTIFIER?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses Ringgold Identifiers. MORE VIDEOS on Ringgold can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3hA4iKHlEK1LnEscVkNWdSf FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to discuss the Ringgold identifier. A Ringgold ID is a unique identifier for organizations in the publishing industry supply chain. The Ringgold database includes nearly half a million institutions who buy or obtain scholarly publications and content. The Ringgold ID was introduced in 2003. Ringgold developed it to identify without question, specific institutional subscribers and other users. The system was created by Ringgold, Incorporated. This company now also publishes a taxonomy for classifying the interests of the organizations. The US National Information Standards Organization, or NISO, recommends that Ringgold identifiers be used to identify organizations in scholarly communications. Ringgold identifiers are used by ORCID as well, to assist in identifying the institutional affiliation of individual researchers. The Ringgold unique identifier starts with an RIN and followed by four to six digits. For example, Harvard University’s Ringgold is RIN 1989. The Ringgold identifier is wide spread and has wide acceptance among publishers and the related information gathering organizations that work with them, such as funders, universities, corporations, government bodies, and many more. It has become one of the most ubiquitous and accepted identifiers, used by publishers and their intermediaries to uniquely identify customers and accurately connect their records across an organization. All publishers and organizations in scholarly communications should be using Ringgold IDs. Aside from providing the Ringgold ID, the company also provides such products or services as Identify Database, Identify Audit Service, CDO, and ProtoView. The company’s motto rightly is “We believe that good data is the foundation of good decisions.” They have helped bring order to an otherwise murky and chaotic part of the data or information marketplace. Well that’s it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist to see more videos about Ringgold. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 104 John Bond
What is a Case Report?
 
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WHAT ARE CASE REPORTS: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting talks about Case Reports in publishing. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPTS Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going talking about Case Reports in scholarly publishing. A Case Report is most closely associated with medical publishing. It is a detailed report of the signs and symptoms, diagnosis and treatment, and the follow-up of an individual patient or sometimes patients. Case Reports normally describe an unusual occurrence in medicine. Some Case Reports may also review the literature associated with the disease state or particular circumstance. There are many types of Case Reports. Some of them are: an unexpected connection between a disease or symptom, an unexpected turn of events in the course of treating a patient, a unique aspect of a disease, a unique approach to treatment, and many others. Case Reports do have play a role in evidence-based medicine. They have helped the with recognition of new diseases and adverse effects of treatments. They can also help understand the spectrum of rare diseases and the unusual presentations of common diseases. Case Reports can also play a role in medical education, particularly with case-based learning. In the hierarchy of scholarly publishing, Case Reports are seen as having lesser value then original research because they are anecdotal in nature. Many journals have rethought Case Reports for this very reason. Case Reports can affect Impact Factor, leading to the further restriction of them among some journals. Some journals have stopped accepting them; others have moved them online only; others have made separate publications. Some Case Report publications have embraced Open Access as the way to ensure a continuing avenue for publication for this format. Some of the largest publishers, Oxford, Sage, Wiley, BMJ, offer publication opportunities for Case Reports, either for Open Access or the traditional model. I am sure the Case Report format will continue to be a valued educational format in scholarly publishing. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me with your questions. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist or more videos about academic publishing. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 132 John Bond
What is a Content Hub?
 
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WHAT IS A CONTENT HUB?: This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses Content Hubs. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process” To find out more about the book: https://www.riverwindsconsulting.com/rfps/ Buy it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Request-Proposal-Publishing-Managing-Process-ebook/dp/B071W7MBLM/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1497619963&sr=1-1&keywords=john+bond+rfps/ SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about content hubs which have become a trendy concept in publishing. First let’s talk about what a content hub is. Content marketing is the process of creating quality, valuable content to attract and engage an audience to a brand which might be a publication or publisher. The content hub is the center or hub of these efforts. Content hubs are centralized destinations to showcase the breadth of what the brand or publication has to offer. They show the full scope and capabilities of the brand, including all its different forms such as text articles, videos, educational modules, infographics, white papers, and much more. A content hub is more likely to be topic or content focused versus a site that covers the whole spectrum of a subject or discipline. It should show the thought leadership from the organization or brand or publisher. This differs from the website which carries all the materials in a navigable fashion. When a reader or customer is looking for the state-of-the-art thinking on a topic, your content hub should be the place they would want to turn to. The content hub is deeper than simply a blog or single piece of content. It should be deep in both perspective and the wealth of the content. Key elements will include being able to navigate or burrow in by subtopic using deep tagging and filters. Personalization is likely an important feature. It should all be owned by the organization; a content hub is not an aggregated play. The term content hub will either continue to evolve and grow, or fall out of fashion. If the term fades away, the concept will continue as readers want deep content sites from recognized authorities. Well that’s it. I’ve released an eBook called, “The Request for Proposal in Publishing: Managing the RFP Process.” It is a short, focused guide to this essential business task that associations or societies use to find potential publishing partners. See the link in the notes below for more information on the book or how to purchase it. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on this video for information on working with a publishing consultant. And make comments below or email me with questions. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 275 John Bond
Reading Journal Articles for Free
 
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HOW NEW TOOLS ALLOW READERS TO FIND FREE RESEARCH ARTICLES. This short video by John Bond of Riverwinds Consulting discusses tools like Unpaywall and Kopernio. FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com JOHN'S NEW BOOK is “Scholarly Publishing: A Primer” To find out more about the book: https://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/about-scholarly-publishing Buy it at Amazon: http://amzn.to/2jqaLPp SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192/ Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am going to talk about new tools to find and access the best available versions of scholarly journal articles; legally and at no cost. There are at least two at this time; Unpaywall and Kopernio. First Unpaywall is an online widget that crawls the web, searching for free-to-read versions of paywalled papers. Unpaywall is a web-browser extension that looks for papers in repositories worldwide, including preprint services and databases. Unpaywall indicates when a free version is found, but also lets you know one is not available. Unpaywall reports that users find fully accessible text for 47% of articles; of course, results vary. They access open data from PubMed Central, the Directory of Open Access Journals, Crossref, and DataCite. Second is Kopernio. Kopernio is a browser plugin that finds the best available PDF of a journal article. Kopernio searches open databases and university subscriptions; if accessible to the user, to find the best version of the article. This tool streamlines finding scholarly content by also accessing such sources as Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, publisher’s platforms, and repositories. Kopernio does two things. For materials that the user’s library has a subscription, Kopernio ensures that the they end up at the publisher’s version, entering the user’s credentials. For materials that the user’s library has not licensed, Kopernio brings the user to an open version if one is available, such as a preprint or an author deposited manuscript in a repository. Kopernio is making news this week as they were acquired by Clarivate Analytics. Kopernio and Unpaywall prides themselves on not including results from sources of questionable legality like Sci-Hub, or even ResearchGate. All of their results are above board, and if they are found out not to be, promptly removed. Both tools, and likely others to come, are in a response to the frustration by users who feel finding appropriate articles is a bit of a maze, particularly when they don’t have access to a federated search tool. Publishers will appreciate more readers finding their materials and users will feel articles are more easily accessible; a win all around. Well that’s it. I am a publishing consultant and work with associations, publishers, and individuals on a host of content related challenges. Reach out to me at Riverwinds.com. Hit the Like button below if you enjoyed this video. Please subscribe to my YouTube channel or click on the playlist or more videos about scholarly publishing. And make comments below. Thank so much and take care.
Views: 181 John Bond